Warren police, FBI search warehouse in cold case investigation

By: Brian Louwers | Warren Weekly | Published August 17, 2018

 Kimberly King, 12, disappeared on Sept. 15, 1979, after she left a friend’s home on Dodge Avenue near Nine Mile  and Hoover,  in Warren.

Kimberly King, 12, disappeared on Sept. 15, 1979, after she left a friend’s home on Dodge Avenue near Nine Mile and Hoover, in Warren.

 Warren Police Commissioner Bill Dwyer said part of the warehouse near Frazho and Schoenherr roads was left “untouched” since convicted murderer Arthur Ream went to prison in 2008.

Warren Police Commissioner Bill Dwyer said part of the warehouse near Frazho and Schoenherr roads was left “untouched” since convicted murderer Arthur Ream went to prison in 2008.

Photo by Brian Louwers

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WARREN — Warren detectives and FBI agents searched a warehouse near Frazho and Schoenherr roads Aug. 13, reportedly as part of a cold case investigation into a girl’s decades-old disappearance.

Warren Police Commissioner Bill Dwyer confirmed that investigators executed a search warrant at a building on Herbert Avenue at Sutherland Avenue. Materials were reportedly taken for analysis by the FBI as part of the ongoing investigation into the 1979 vanishing of 12-year-old Kimberly King.

“We’re the lead agency in the investigation. We were there with the FBI,” Dwyer said. “There was what we believe to be evidence that’s going to assist us in our ongoing investigation of a cold case. I know that the detectives, as well as the FBI, are cautiously optimistic that once this evidence is taken to the lab and processed, it’s going to be very beneficial.”

Dwyer said part of the warehouse was searched previously by police in Eastpointe investigating the 1986 disappearance of 13-year-old Cindy Zarzycki after the man now convicted of killing her, Arthur Ream, led police to the girl’s body 10 years ago. Ream reportedly operated a carpet business and had an office at the warehouse in Warren, adjacent to a butcher shop.

“What is particularly interesting is that the primary location has been undisturbed since he (Ream) went to prison,” Dwyer said. “That warehouse, a portion of it had been disturbed, but the area we searched was untouched.”

Last October, Nina Innsted featured the Kimberly King case on her “Already Gone” true crime podcast. The episode, and the Warren Police Department’s efforts to take a fresh look at the case, prompted a story by a local television news station in December.

The renewed investigation, led by Warren police detectives James Twardesky and Brent Chisolm, along with Chicago-based cold case investigator Jennifer Lebo, included new interviews with Ream. That led to a weeklong search of a wooded area near 23 Mile Road and North Avenue in Macomb Township in early May, not far from the site where Ream buried Zarzycki.

The dig was later suspended, but Dwyer said the investigative team would evaluate what it learned and continue its investigation. Investigators in May said they believed the remains of up to six more missing girls, including King, could have been buried on the property.

“I am always thankful for any efforts by law enforcement to push this case forward,” Innsted said by text message Aug. 16. “I am waiting patiently for results on any items they located in the hopes that it leads to the return of Kim King.”

King was last seen on Sept. 15, 1979, after she left a friend’s home on Dodge Avenue, near Nine Mile and Hoover roads.

Anyone with information about the case can reach Warren detectives at (586) 574-4810.

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