Among the programs made possible by Parent Teacher Organizations in the Roseville School District is the Eighth Grade Celebration at Eastland Middle School, an event designed to celebrate the students’ hard work and friendships before moving on to high school.

Among the programs made possible by Parent Teacher Organizations in the Roseville School District is the Eighth Grade Celebration at Eastland Middle School, an event designed to celebrate the students’ hard work and friendships before moving on to high school.

Photo provided by Denise Brun


Parent Teacher Organizations provide additional help for schools

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published November 22, 2019

EASTPOINTE/ROSEVILLE — For a school to work, the faculty must have a positive relationship with the parents. Parent Teacher Organizations, such as those at schools in Roseville, often fill that role and provide unseen aid that makes the education of students possible.

In Roseville Community Schools, each of its schools has at least one organization that allows parents to play an active role in their child’s school community.

“It’s a relationship between the staff, administration and the parents. Volunteering benefits every child. We make things possible that might not be possible or affordable,” said Denise Brun, the president of the Eastland Middle School PTO. “Having parents and guardians who want to see that happen are important.”

PTOs provide a variety of services for schools. This often consists of fundraising projects, but also can include lending a hand on projects, acting as chaperones at events or providing organizational support.

“Raising funds for things in the school is our main goal. We run a clothing closet for kids who have a clothing need or a clothing violation during school hours. We try to support the principal and projects the school is doing. He’s pushing for picnic tables outside, for instance, so we are trying to aid in getting them,” said Roseville Middle School PTO President Jackie Oliveri. “We just helped organize the homecoming parade. We are helping raise funds for a bullying assembly. We are decorating the building with new posters and paintings to foster a positive state for the students.”

“We do a lot of fundraising, and this includes everything from selling concessions to hosting a walk-a-thon in the spring,” added Brun. “This money directly benefits the students by helping a teacher pay for a field trip or helping afford bringing in a program that isn’t in the budget. We try to provide little extra things for the students.”

Each PTO is structured differently, but they all have officers made up of volunteers from among the parents of enrolled students. They then lead other volunteer parents in planning projects and initiatives, and then carrying them out.

“There’s four officers at Eastland in our PTO, but several more members. These kids are our future, and we owe it to them to help further their education,” said Brun. “We meet the third Thursday of each month from 4 to 5 p.m.” 

School administrators agree that the PTOs are essential to allow the district to function at its highest capacity.

“Our PTOs are integral parts of the school community,” Roseville Superintendent Mark Blaszkowski said in an email. “They support the schools through the creation of events to pull the community together and provide financial support through fundraising to make these opportunities happen.”

Both Brun and Oliveri said that PTOs are always looking for more people, and they hope more parents in the Roseville district will step up.

“I think a common problem with our groups is not having enough people. People can join by calling the school office,” Oliveri said. “It’s not what people think it is. It’s not about cliques, and it’s not a bunch of stay-at-home moms; it’s all about parents who care about the students and want to do something to help their education.”

Both also said the organizations make a significant and noticeable difference.

“When you volunteer with a school, you are sacrificing some of your own personal time, but it is worth it,” Brun said. “The kids appreciate it and the staff appreciates it.”

“It really makes a difference,” said Oliveri. “The staff can’t do everything. Without parental support, the kids miss out on a lot.”

Call Staff Writer Brendan Losinski at (586) 498-1068.