Makers work on the jewelry they’ve created July 26 for Mend on the Move. The organization hires women from Samaritas House Detroit to make jewelry, which they sell.

Makers work on the jewelry they’ve created July 26 for Mend on the Move. The organization hires women from Samaritas House Detroit to make jewelry, which they sell.

Photo by Sean Work


Nonprofit hopes to go mobile with fundraiser

By: Maddie Forshee | West Bloomfield Beacon | Published July 30, 2018

 Mend on the Move is a West Bloomfield-based nonprofit that helps women transition out of abuse.

Mend on the Move is a West Bloomfield-based nonprofit that helps women transition out of abuse.

Photo by Sean Work

WEST BLOOMFIELD — Mend on the Move, a West Bloomfield-based nonprofit, is raising money to live up to its name and hit the road in a mobile studio.

Mend on the Move was founded in 2015 by Joanne Ewald, a West Bloomfield resident and survivor of abuse. 

“Mend on the Move employs women who are abuse survivors,” said Ewald. “They create jewelry made from auto parts so they can have a source of income while they go through the recover program.”

The makers sell their pieces wholesale and at art and craft fairs. 

The nonprofit has launched a campaign to raise $60,000 to “Keep Mend Moving,” in order to retrofit a motor home donated to the organization to create a moving art studio. 

“Before Mend even launched, I knew it was going to be a mobile nonprofit, that we would be going to the survivors,” said Ewald. “How that was going to evolve, I didn’t know.” 

The 30-foot motor home was donated to the organization by a community member, and it had already been gutted. The organization has an interior design plan, but needs to rebuild and customize the vehicle, and needs the funds to do so. 

“The community has been so generous already,” said Ewald. “That’s how we’ve been so successful.” 

Currently, Mend on the Move works with Samaritas House Detroit, Heartline, a safe haven that provides shelter, food and support to women who are homeless or have recently left incarceration. 

“Making jewelry ... it’s amazing,” said Mend on the Move Creative Director Dawn Wood. “We get to sit and talk about our struggles, our strengths, all together. It is very therapeutic.” 

Mend on the Move hires about five to six women at a time. 

“You get people from all walks of life,” said Wood. “Someone you may not have connected with in a normal environment, and you just have that connection.” 

The hope is to expand the nonprofit’s reach to other recovery homes and give the organization a permanent workspace to make the jewelry, as well as to organize the parts and even sell the pieces. 

“We’ve really outgrown the recovery home we’re in right now,” said Ewald. “Our mobile studio would give us a permanent home. To our survivors, that would be huge. ... We’d be able to go to other recovery homes.” 

People can contribute any amount of money to the fundraiser. More information can be found at Mend on the Move’s website, www.mendonthemove.org.