Crews battle this blaze inside a vent stack for an incinerator used to burn off nonrecyclable material as part of the recycling process at a facility on Stephenson Highway Jan. 24.

Crews battle this blaze inside a vent stack for an incinerator used to burn off nonrecyclable material as part of the recycling process at a facility on Stephenson Highway Jan. 24.

Photo provided by the Troy Fire Department


Incinerator failure sparks fire at industrial equipment supplier in Troy

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published January 29, 2020

 Firefighters use a 1 3/4-inch fire hose from the fire truck to successfully put out a fire that started in the incinerator.

Firefighters use a 1 3/4-inch fire hose from the fire truck to successfully put out a fire that started in the incinerator.

Photo provided by the Troy Fire Department

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TROY — Firefighters were called to extinguish a fire in an incinerator at an industrial equipment supplier at 835 Stephenson Highway just after 3:30 p.m. Jan. 24 after equipment reportedly failed — allowing flames to leap 4 feet high.

According to a press release, fire crews arrived to find thick, black smoke coming from the roof, but no smoke or fire was visible from inside the building.

Normal operations continued at the business, according to the release. Firefighters accessed the roof and discovered fire inside a vent stack for an incinerator used to burn off nonrecyclable material as part of the recycling process, the release states.

Firefighters spoke with site managers and learned that a flame unit used in the burning process had failed and allowed the partially unburned products to ignite in the vent stack.

Crews used dry chemical fire extinguishers through a vent opening on the side of the incinerator, but that was unsuccessful.

Firefighters used a garden hose through the vent opening to slowly cool the inside of the unit, again without success, so crews used a 1 3/4-inch fire hose from the fire truck to successfully put out the fire, according to the release.

Crews monitored the temperatures using a handheld thermal imaging camera.

After the flames were knocked down, firefighters opened the furnace and extinguished the remaining fire and confirmed that the fire had not extended to the roof, according to the release.

Fire officials reportedly advised the building management to have the incinerator, the secondary flame unit and the vent stack serviced before they used it again.

No one was hurt, and the building was allowed to remain open, the release states. The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

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