Eastpointe High School will have its first graduating class since the district changed its name from East Detroit Public Schools to Eastpointe Community Schools.

Eastpointe High School will have its first graduating class since the district changed its name from East Detroit Public Schools to Eastpointe Community Schools.

Photo provided by Marissa Hoard


Graduating seniors make Eastpointe, Roseville proud

By: Bria Brown | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published May 30, 2018

 Senior Loren Burns’ double rocking chair took home the top prize at the Michigan Industrial and Technology Education Society’s state competition earlier in May. He will be among more than 300 students in the 2018 Roseville High School graduating class.

Senior Loren Burns’ double rocking chair took home the top prize at the Michigan Industrial and Technology Education Society’s state competition earlier in May. He will be among more than 300 students in the 2018 Roseville High School graduating class.

Photo provided by Joe Genest

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EASTPOINTE/ROSEVILLE — Seniors at Eastpointe High School and Roseville High School are closing their four-year chapters May 31 and will embark on a new journey in the fall. For these students, their teachers, counselors, college advisers, friends and family members have been with them each step of the way. 

 

Eastpointe  

Eastpointe High School will celebrate its first graduating class at 7 p.m. May 31 at the Macomb Community College Sports and Expo Center, 14500 E. 12 Mile Road in Warren, after the district changed its name from East Detroit Public Schools to Eastpointe Community Schools. The Eastpointe Alternative Center graduation will be at 7 p.m. June 6 in the EHS auditorium, 15501 Couzens Ave.

EHS has 164 graduates, 97 of whom have been accepted to two- or four-year institutions as of May 22. At least three students have announced plans to join the military as of the EHS decision day assembly. In addition to the $40,000 in local scholarships from community and alumni groups, EHS students have accepted more than $252,000 in scholarships from the institutions they plan to attend, according to EHS college adviser Logan Walthall.

EHS senior Sydney Floyd — who will attend the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the fall — said she feels there’s been a lot of positive changes with the district’s name change.  

“East Detroit had a reputation that didn’t represent the now Eastpointe. Now there’s a lot more changes happening, and you can definitely see it within the students,” said Floyd. 

Floyd admitted that there are students who still consider themselves “East Detroit,” while she sees the “new era.” 

“I see a lot of new (Advanced Placement) classes at the school, I see a lot of students are wanting to do college courses now, and there hasn’t been a lot of fights,” she said. “I’m not sure if that’s because of the name change, or just students, in general, wanting to change and are maturing.” 

Floyd is looking forward to attending the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she plans to major in history with a minor in Spanish, but she’s excited and nervous about graduation. 

“I’m excited to start this new journey in my life, but I’m also a bit nervous about how everything is going to go. But I’m excited nevertheless,” said Floyd. 

Floyd said that helping the homeless in culinary arts class was a fond memory that she has with her classmates.

“I’ve never seen so many people come together when they are emotionally attached to a topic like that,” she said. “I believe some of the students in the school have been homeless, and these are our friends, so we wanted to help give back to them.” 

The students started a charity drive collecting coats and gloves for Michigan winters. 

“It was so many people that gave to the community, and we were really happy to help,” she said. 

As for advice to the incoming seniors in the fall, Floyd said she wants those students to focus on what matters most and not to get sidetracked. 

 “Get your (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) done. Get everything for college that you need to get done before January, and if not, try to get it done before March,” said Floyd. 

A person who provided key help to Floyd was her college adviser. 

“Always visit your college adviser. I think I’ve been in the college adviser’s office almost every day,” she said. 

EHS Principal Greg Roberts told the Eastsider his hopes for this graduating class. 

“I am so proud of the progress this class has made, not only in helping to change the culture of the school, but also academically.  I am confident that this group will make Eastpointe proud by their future achievements,” said Roberts. 

 

Roseville 

On May 31, more than 300 Roseville High School students will graduate at 7 p.m. at Bethesda Christian Church, 14000 Metro Parkway in Sterling Heights. RHS Principal Pat Adams is extremely proud of the 2018 class, and he told the Eastsider that this is a “remarkable group of students.”

“This class took more Advanced Placement courses, earned more STEM awards through our robotics program, and won more athletic championships than any class in recent memory.  We are extremely proud of their accomplishments and honor their place in the journey to make RHS an exemplary destination school,” he said. 

RHS senior Loren Burns won the Woodworking State Grand Championship in high school woodworking with his creation of a double rocking chair at the Michigan Industrial and Technology Education Society (MITES) state competition, held May 9-12 at Lansing Center. For the second consecutive year, Burns won the Grand Championship prize, which is awarded to the best project out of all the woodworking categories, earning him a $5,000 scholarship, according to a press release from the district.   

He won the award last year for his creation of a traditional single rocking chair.  

“Winning the first time was the best one, because after my freshman and sophomore year, (RHS woodshop teacher) Mr. (Ronald) Holmes saw my potential and talent, not only to be a woodworker, but my potential in general,” he said.

Burns is excited to proceed in his career. He plans to apply to the millwrights local union as soon as he’s out of school.

“I’m ready and I’m finally able to do it,” he said. 

Burns has been in the district since preschool and says Holmes was a huge influence. Burns also said that the skills he learned in Holmes’ class could be used in and out of the classroom for everyday life. 

“I can’t give enough thanks to Mr. Holmes for what he’s done for me and everyone in his class,” he said. “He’s done so much to prepare me for my career. I still have a lot to learn, but I’m well-prepared.”  

Burns also said his woodshop class taught him independence and discipline. 

Holmes stated in a district press release that the key to Burns’ growth was being humble toward his educational goals and successes. 

“Loren has been patient with every project and the various steps of those projects, which has led him to higher growth as a woodworker and individual,” Holmes stated. 

Burns said he’s grateful that RHS has kept the woodshop classes. 

“There’s so many technical education schools dying, and a lot of schools don’t have woodshop, but I’m grateful RHS was able to prepare me for that,” he said.  

To the incoming RHS senior class this fall, Burns said they need to finish strong.  

“A lot of people, when they become seniors, they fluff it off as their last year and everything tends to go downhill. I’d recommend that they finish strong and on a good note,” said Burns. 

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