Features

Published February 12, 2015

SYLVAN LAKE — Sylvan Lake residents will start their morning by jumping in the icy lake and end their day with a warm bowl of chili Feb. 28.

Registration for the third annual Sylvan Lake Polar Plunge will begin at 11 a.m. at the Community Center, and the parade of costumes and the plunge will begin at noon.

Proceeds will benefit Special Olympics Michigan.

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Published February 11, 2015

GROSSE POINTE PARK — There’s a gulf of generations between them, but on stage, the musicians in what’s come to be known as Marge’s Bar Band are a tight unit brought together by a mutual passion for a style of music that predates all of them.

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Published February 11, 2015

GROSSE POINTE SHORES — A playground scuffle between two 11-year-old boys kicks off a confrontation between their respective parents that will have audience members asking who the immature figures really are in “God of Carnage,” the latest production from Grosse Pointe Theatre offshoot the Purdon Studio Theatre.

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Published February 11, 2015

ROSEVILLE — This month’s photo is of the Frank Biehl Sheetmetal & Electrical Work building on Gratiot Avenue in what is now Roseville, circa 1926.

The Biehl family lived in an apartment at the back of the building during the 1920s — note the side porch in the photograph — and Frank Biehl eventually became Roseville Village president.

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Published February 10, 2015

BLOOMFIELD TOWNSHIP — The community is invited to the Bloomfield Township Public Library at 7 p.m. Feb. 12 to share in the storytelling of Amy Elliott Bragg. The program is a presentation of the Bloomfield Historical Society, in conjunction with the library.

As an author and historian, Bragg, of Ferndale, is also the co-founder of the Detroit Drunken Historical Society and president of Preservation Detroit.

It was Bragg’s love of local history, as well as libations, that led to the creation of the Detroit Drunken Historical Society nearly three years ago.

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Published February 11, 2015

In this photograph taken during the winter of 1959, Aaron Oswald waves from the wooden aqueduct that once carried the Clinton and Kalamazoo Canal across the Clinton River near Yates Mill. Work on the canal, which was to join Lake Michigan to Lake St. Clair across Lower Michigan, began in 1839. Only a 16-mile section from Mount Clemens to Rochester was completed before a lack of funds ended the canal project in 1844. The aqueduct started leaking soon after it was built around 1840 and continued to leak until it finally rotted away in the 1970s.

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Published February 10, 2015

The holiday that Christians celebrate as the resurrection of Jesus Christ and new life emerging at spring inspires Polish Americans to create the ancient art of pisanki and share their culture, food, folklore and customs.

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Published February 9, 2015

The North American International Auto Show’s exhibits and displays have left Detroit’s Cobo Center until next year, but some local dealerships say the intense public interest has made an impact on selling award-winning vehicles in the showroom.

At the most recent auto show in January, the Volkswagen Golf won the award of 2015 North American Car of the Year, and the Ford F-150 took North American Truck/Utility of the Year. The announcement was made at a Jan. 12 press preview day.

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Published February 6, 2015

When we think of the Underground Railroad — the network that led slaves of African-descent to freedom — it’s possible we think of hidden passageways leading to free states in the U.S., or even Canada.

However, according to “Pathways to Freedom,” an exhibit on the second floor of the Southfield Public Library, 26000 Evergreen Road, slaves also took routes south to Mexico to be free.

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Published February 4, 2015

METRO DETROIT — Many adults probably remember coming home from school in their youth, slinging their backpacks on the kitchen table and then getting a start on their homework.

While some children and adults still do that today, it’s not as prevalent as it used to be.

It really comes down to how a house is divided. Older homes are notorious for not offering the abundance of space that new homes today have, especially in the form of cabinets and countertops.

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Published February 4, 2015

Berkley students and community members get ready for a bonfire during homecoming week in 1979. Berkley High School annually held a big bonfire every year on the night of homecoming.

The 1979 bonfire ended up being the final one, as the event was canceled due to safety concerns in the community.

James Tong, with the Berkley Historical Museum, came across this photo while compiling it as part of “Images of America: Berkley,” which is available at the Berkley Public Library, Barnes & Noble and Amazon.com.

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Published February 4, 2015

ORCHARD LAKE — Seventy years ago, the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp in southern Poland was liberated by the Soviet Army.

Auschwitz-Birkenau was the largest of the Nazi German concentration/death camps, and approximately 1.1 million people were murdered there, including about 1 million Jewish people, 70,000-75,000 Polish people, about 21,000 Sinti and Roma people, and many others.

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Published February 4, 2015

WEST BLOOMFIELD — Two Muses Theatre of West Bloomfield will draw back the curtain for the Women’s Playwriting Festival 8 p.m. Feb. 20 and 21, and 2 p.m. Feb. 22.

Proceeds will benefit Two Muses Theatre, a nonprofit, professional theater dedicated to increasing opportunities for female artists and artisans.

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Published February 3, 2015

BIRMINGHAM — For thousands of years, the differences between the many religions of the world have created barriers between cultures and people.

But sometimes, there are pieces of each faith — from stories and symbols to even ceremonies — that can actually bring people together and show just how similar sacred beliefs are at their core.

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Published February 2, 2015

Hundreds of thousands of people flocked to Detroit’s Cobo Center in January during the North American International Auto Show to get a driver’s seat perspective of upcoming cars and concept vehicles.

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Published January 29, 2015

GROSSE POINTE FARMS — If you can’t beat Mother Nature, join her.

That seems to be the idea behind Winterfest on the Hill, an annual afternoon of free fun, food, entertainment and games for all ages that’s open to anyone and runs from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Jan. 31 along Kercheval in the Farms business district.

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Published January 28, 2015

Being a bride isn’t what it used to be.

Once the flowers are chosen and the gown is found, the styling for her big day isn’t over — it’s only just begun.

A wedding dress is only part of an overall look, according to experts, and each detail needs to be planned to perfection from head to toenail.

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Published January 28, 2015

Radon gas is the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers, and high levels of the gas in a house meet the equivalent of smoking eight cigarettes a day, say World Health Organization officials.

Radon gas invades homes and buildings through foundation cracks and openings, and is invisible with no scent. If a test kit determines high levels of radon in a home, simple fixes can lower health risks.

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Published January 26, 2015

The North American International Auto Show is all about the visuals: the screens, the exhibits and, of course, the design of the vehicles themselves.

During the auto show, which was open to the public Jan. 17-25, the College for Creative Studies in Detroit maintained an exhibit presence while displaying some models of aerodynamic vehicles that its students made.

On a Jan. 12 press preview day, Paul Snyder, CCS chair of transportation design, was on hand to answer questions and make observations about the future of auto design.

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Published January 21, 2015

This month’s photograph is of the Kaiser Building, formerly located in Eastpointe on the southeast corner of Nine Mile and Gratiot. The basement of this building was used for the village of Halfway’s municipal offices, as well as for the city’s first library. The village of Halfway was the local government from 1924-1929, when it became the city of East Detroit. The photo itself is undated.

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