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In response to the coronavirus pandemic, C & G Newspapers has temporarily suspended its print publications. We look forward to resuming our print operation in the coming weeks. In the meantime, continue to find local news on our website and look for us on Facebook and Twitter. We hope you stay healthy and safe.

Features

Published March 28, 2016

The sunny side of the street might also be the more dangerous side if drivers fail to take precautionary steps to fight sun glare while driving.

According to an alert from AAA, sun glare is becoming more of a factor this time of year due to the recent start of daylight saving time and the timing of daily commutes.

The agency says drivers who have to drive amid sun glare should follow some tips to avoid being blinded, which could endanger other vehicles or pedestrians.

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Published March 30, 2016

WARREN — Mayor Jim Fouts will be live on the airwaves beginning in late April.

Never short of opinions on topics ranging from insurance reform to fireworks to personal property taxes, Fouts said he will take part in a weekly call-in radio show on WFDF 910 AM in the 4-5 p.m. times lot, beginning on Saturday, April 23.

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Published March 24, 2016

Online Only

1. Spend a day in Bunnyville
March 25-26 • The Detroit Zoo, 8450 W. 10 Mile Road, Royal Oak

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Published March 29, 2016

MACOMB COUNTY — Macomb County Public Works Commissioner Anthony Marrocco was recently honored by the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) for his 10-year commitment to the Adopt-A-Highway program.

Marrocco sponsors and volunteers with the cleanup of 2 miles of Hall Road through the program.

“We have to start somewhere,” Marrocco said. “Why not start in our own county, get the trash cleaned up, then we can focus on prevention and make an even bigger impact in keeping Macomb beautiful.”

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Published March 23, 2016

GROSSE POINTE FARMS — They say necessity is the mother of invention. For Grosse Pointe Memorial Church Music Minister James Biery, it was also what prompted him to compose a new musical drama.

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Published March 23, 2016

GROSSE POINTE PARK/PLYMOUTH — Kevin Urso was the eldest of Gail and John Urso’s three sons. John Urso said Kevin was “always a challenge as a child” and “strong-willed,” but also someone who loved animals and children, a caregiver by nature who found his calling working with youths at the Children’s Home of Detroit in Grosse Pointe Woods.

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Published March 23, 2016

GROSSE POINTE FARMS — Runners, you can lace up your sneakers. The Grosse Pointe South High School Athletic Booster Club has gotten the go-ahead for its annual Run the Pointe race, which will take place in the Farms this year, starting and ending at South.

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Published March 23, 2016

MACOMB COUNTY — Candice Murray admits she’s not the most technically savvy person around.

In fact, the Clinton Township grandmother still solely uses a landline telephone without call waiting, doesn’t have cable and opened up a Facebook page four years ago, only to never log on again.

But that doesn’t keep her from finding free and fun things to do and knowing where to get the big discounts around metro Detroit.

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Published March 23, 2016

FRASER — Five 21-year-old musicians from metro Detroit are doing their best to imitate their favorite musicians, and yet create a product all their own.

If Walls Could Talk is the name of the group that aims to make a splash in the music scene.

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Published March 23, 2016

The Sterling Heights City Council recently clicked “on” for a proposal that officials say will fund new city customer service software to make handling resident concerns more efficient.

During a March 15 meeting, the council voted unanimously to fund the SeeClickFix software and its accompanying app for three years — starting July 1 — at an annual rate of $18,696. The proposal was part of the city’s consent agenda, and City Council members did not discuss the issue during the meeting.

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Published March 23, 2016

HUNTINGTON WOODS — The study of bringing senior alternative housing options into Huntington Woods will enter its second phase after the City Commission approved funds March 15 to hold two public forums on the matter.

In August of last year, the commission approved phase one of the study, headed by City Planner Hank Berry, after the Senior Advisory Committee had been using subcommittees to review the needs of the city’s senior population, including housing alternatives.

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Published March 23, 2016

FERNDALE — The city of Ferndale, in collaboration with five other communities, was awarded a 2016 Transportation Alternatives Program grant last summer in the amount of $194,227 to create the Woodward Corridor Neighborhood Bicycle Network to connect all six cities.

With signage already going up and construction plans underway, Ferndale officials found out early this year that the low bid for the project came in 16 percent higher than expected, which would cost the city another $47,000 for the project.

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Published March 23, 2016

TROY — Unleash your inner comedian during a program on the art of improvisation at the library.

Karen Bell-Brege has managed the house troupe at Mark Ridley’s Comedy Castle for 13 years, and holds programs for corporations and teens. She held a program for teens at the Troy Public Library last year, and Connie Doherty, head of adult information services for library, thought Bell-Brege would be a good fit for adults in April, which is National Humor Month.

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Published March 23, 2016

ST. CLAIR SHORES — Although residents have approved a similar millage every few years since 2003, the proposal facing St. Clair Shores this August will have a few notable changes: namely, a higher millage rate and a lack of a guarantee of staffing levels in the ballot language.

The proposed language being put before voters Aug. 2 will call for up to 5 mills to be levied on residents for the next three years, beginning in 2017, to pay for police and fire operations in the city, an increase from the previous 2 mills levied.

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Published March 23, 2016

ST. CLAIR SHORES — Ford was just beginning to ramp up production of personal vehicles in 1946, after a break to make tanks and military vehicles during World War II, when Roy O’Brien Ford opened its doors on the corner of Nine Mile and Mack.

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Published March 23, 2016

FERNDALE — The residential parking zones (RPZ) program is getting closer to implementation, but following the March 14 City Council meeting, residents in the designated zones will not have to pay for passes for at least the first year.

The RPZ program was piloted in 2011 on West Troy and West Saratoga streets before Assistant City Manager Joseph Gacioch brought it back before council in 2015 in order to expand the program.

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Published March 23, 2016

MADISON HEIGHTS — State law says that all shelter animals must be spayed and neutered before they can be adopted out. For the Madison Heights Animal Shelter, this can be quite expensive, and in the past the shelter has had to lean on local rescue groups to pick up the cost. But those rescues aren’t made of money either, so it’s been tough all around.

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Published March 23, 2016

HAZEL PARK — The Hazel Park District Library has made many cuts in recent years, such as reducing hours and staff, and slashing the materials and programming budget. With the exception of the replacement of its heating and cooling system, the library hasn’t spent any money from fund balance either. On the contrary, it’s been adding money. 

But it still hasn’t been enough to restore the library to its former self.

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Published March 23, 2016

MADISON HEIGHTS — Among the volunteers at the Animal Welfare Society of Southeastern Michigan (AWS) is Theresa Gorelick, of Madison Heights. Since 2012, she has been a driving force at the no-kill rescue, finding homes for the animals there and educating the public on the importance of spaying and neutering.

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Published March 23, 2016

SOUTHFIELD — A local hospital is one of the first institutions in the country to test a new technique of treating heart attacks.

Providence-Providence Park Hospital, 16001 W. Nine Mile Road, announced recently that it is the first hospital in the U.S. to enroll a patient in a study of a system that uses oxygen to reduce the damage caused by heart attacks.

Called the Evaluation of Intracoronary Hyperoxemic Oxygen Therapy study, it will involve 100 patients at up to 15 centers across the country.

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Upcoming Events

The events in our calendar were submitted prior to the coronavirus crisis. As efforts have increased to contain the spread of the coronavirus, many events have been canceled. Read More... On March 13, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer issued an executive order to cancel all events statewide that involve more than 250 people. It is recommended that you call ahead if you still intend to attend one of these events.

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