Westview’s Orchards & Winery brings fresh produce to the Troy Farmers Market June 26.

Westview’s Orchards & Winery brings fresh produce to the Troy Farmers Market June 26.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Troy Farmers Market freshens up

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published July 7, 2020

 Madison’s Closet, a new vendor at the Troy Farmers Market this year, is a family-owned business based in Howell that sells herbs, pie filling, jams, produce, breads and other handmade items.

Madison’s Closet, a new vendor at the Troy Farmers Market this year, is a family-owned business based in Howell that sells herbs, pie filling, jams, produce, breads and other handmade items.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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TROY — About 500 people stopped by the Troy Farmers Market June 19 and 26, shopping outdoors for fresh produce and other food items.

The Troy Farmers Market, now in its third year, is held noon-5 p.m. Fridays through Sept. 25 in the parking lot of the Troy Public Library.

Kit Duffield, of Kit’s Garden, returned to the Troy Farmers Market for the second year. She grows and sells produce, such as heirloom and cherry tomatoes, herbs, lettuces, and zucchini that she said packs more wow factor than what you see in grocery stores.

She said shoppers were “doing the right thing,” abiding by social distancing guidelines at the market. She returned to the market this year because, “I have good sales from nice people.”

The city of Troy asks shoppers to observe these guidelines at the Troy Farmers Market:

• Wear a face covering.

• Be mindful of 6-foot distancing.

• Bring small, exact bills if you will be paying with cash.

• Refrain from touching vendors’ products. They will be happy to assist you.

• Capacity is monitored, so you have to wait to enter.

“It’s so awesome to see people go out with multiple shopping bags (filled),” said Cindy Stewart, the city’s director of community affairs and manager of the Troy Farmers Market.

“All the friendly vendors and customers, as well as the people running it and the location, make it an easy choice,” Greg Phinney, of Phinney’s Farm Market, said via email.

“We sell vegetable starter plants, herbs, sunflowers and produce, including tomatoes, beets, lettuce and peppers. We use organic methods. We use non-GMO organic seeds, mainly heirloom varieties, row cover for pest control, as well as other mechanical stuff. Currently, no pesticides,” he said.

“I started farming due to the need for clean, fresh, wholesome food,” he said. “My father died of cancer. He never drank or smoked, so I figured it was either the environment or the food. I can’t control the environment, so I figured I can at least control the food my family eats, as well as my community.  That’s what spurred me into farming. I used to garden with my father at a very young age.”

There is a food truck on-site at the market as well. Visit troymi.gov for a list of vendors.

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