Earlier this month, more than 60 vendors from across Michigan came to Mount Clemens for the ninth annual Mount Clemens Made in Michigan Show. It was held in the heart of the city’s downtown restaurant and retail district, on Macomb Place.

Earlier this month, more than 60 vendors from across Michigan came to Mount Clemens for the ninth annual Mount Clemens Made in Michigan Show. It was held in the heart of the city’s downtown restaurant and retail district, on Macomb Place.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Mount Clemens hosts Made in Michigan Show

By: Alex Szwarc | Mount Clemens - Clinton - Harrison Journal | Published May 26, 2021

MOUNT CLEMENS — It was designed as a way to highlight Michigan-produced products with a local flair.

Organized by the Mount Clemens Downtown Development Authority, the Mount Clemens Made in Michigan Show took place May 7-8.

This was the ninth year for the show, which featured over 60 vendors.

It was held in the heart of the city’s downtown restaurant and retail district. The show area was on Macomb Place between North Walnut Street and South Gratiot Avenue.

“All items sold at the Downtown Mount Clemens Made in Michigan show must be made, grown, assembled, or manufactured in Michigan,” an event flyer stated. “The goal of this event is to showcase Michigan Made products and companies, and to give attendees an opportunity to purchase and support our local Michigan economy.”

Michelle Weiss, DDA marketing coordinator, said the show was about educating consumers about all the different types of products and goods made in Michigan.

“It helps make people aware that we are keeping our local dollars here, recirculating through the local economy, helping support jobs and invest in the state,” Weiss said. “We want to bring an audience into the downtown to showcase our businesses that are here every day.”

Vendors, who came to Mount Clemens from places like Traverse City and Charlevoix, were spaced out at least six feet apart to keep everyone safe, Weiss noted.  

Due to hardships associated with doing business in a pandemic, Weiss said the DDA is “trying to help the small guy.”

“With what we’ve all been through, the artists, crafters and vendors haven’t worked all year,” she added. “Some of them have taken on other jobs.”

Some businesses that attended were Dobre Foods, Pooches & Smooches, Rustic Relics by Alex, and The Woodcrafter.

In addition to the show, on May 8, the Mount Clemens Kids’ Business Fair took place. The fair was billed as a great opportunity for children ages 8-17 to experience entrepreneurship in a one-day showcase.

“We’ve done this for a couple of years,” Weiss said. “We want to get younger people involved in business, showing them some of the tricks of the trade. They are going to be our next generation of young entrepreneurs.”

It was an opportunity for kids to create a business and sell a product or service. Businesses ranged from baking to bath and beauty, jewelers, stationary, clothing and more.

Prizes were awarded to the businesses that judges believe went the extra mile during the event. Businesses were judged in the areas of best branding/visual display, best sales pitch/salesperson and brightest business mind.