CARE receives $600,000 grant

By: Brendan Losinski | C&G Newspapers | Published July 1, 2021

 CARE of Southeastern Michigan recently received a $600,000 grant to help fund more recovery coaches in the community to help combat substance abuse.

CARE of Southeastern Michigan recently received a $600,000 grant to help fund more recovery coaches in the community to help combat substance abuse.

Photo provided by Erika Jones

Advertisement

MACOMB COUNTY — CARE of Southeastern Michigan will be receiving a $600,000 grant over the next three years to address substance abuse and health issues.

For more than 40 years, CARE has led efforts in the Macomb County area regarding substance use prevention and recovery services. The grant, which comes from the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, will allow CARE to move forward with the development of its proposed Communities of Recovery program.

“We are able to provide apprentice peer recovery coach-related trainings at no cost  to individuals in recovery who are seeking a career as a recovery coach,” Patty Wagenhofer, CARE’s chief operating officer, said in an email. “There are additional trainings that will be offered to support the apprentice recovery coach to further develop their career path. This grant also allows CARE to reimburse up to 40 apprentice peer recovery coaches who complete the trainings and associated internship for $1,000.”

The Communities of Recovery program will be based out of the CARE Recovery United Community Center in Fraser and will include a number of resources for those wishing to become peer recovery coaches. This includes training, work experience and technical support to take exams to obtain the proper credentials from the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. CARE said its goal is to increase the number of peer recovery coaches while providing recovery services in non-treatment settings.

This  program will begin with placing peer recovery coaches in the Macomb County Jail, Macomb County Probation Office and a homeless shelter for veterans.

“We look forward to our partnership with CARE of Southeastern Michigan with Peer Coaching of inmates here at the Macomb County Jail,” Macomb County Sheriff Anthony Wickersham stated in a press release.

“In addition to the workforce development element, peer recovery support services will be provided in non-clinical settings. This includes the jail, courts and a shelter for veterans,” said Wagenhofer. “CARE wants to help our community heal from the illness of substance use addiction, one person at a time.”

Since 2012, CARE of Southeastern Michigan has been trying to increase the number of peer recovery coaches in the community. These efforts began with five coaches and have grown into a team of more than 35 that operate a 5,300-square-foot facility, known as the CARE Recovery United Community Center. In addition to the community center, CARE provides coaches to five hospital systems, four local courts, several primary care facilities and the Macomb County Office of Substance Abuse.

 “We are very excited that SAMHSA selected our proposal, and we are looking forward to working with our community partners,” Susan Styf, CARE’s president and CEO, stated in a press release. “Our peer coaches are able to uniquely understand the barriers that people face in their recovery journey, and this program will allow us to reach more people that need help.”

Wagenhofer said one of the key factors in this program is that it involves both trained professionals and those who have lived through the recovery process.

“The project is currently under development, and full implementation is expected to begin September 2021,” she wrote. “Individuals who are in recovery themselves have a unique advantage of lived experiences and are able to walk alongside other individuals who seek recovery themselves in ways that other professionals have not been able to do.”

Advertisement