Danielle Workman, right, said her life experience raising children and losing a husband gives her a unique perspective in serving her clients’ financial needs.

Danielle Workman, right, said her life experience raising children and losing a husband gives her a unique perspective in serving her clients’ financial needs.

Photo provided by Danielle Workman


Women talk about how passion drives their business

By: Tiffany Esshaki | C&G Newspapers | Published November 10, 2020

 Nicole Hudson, the president and founder of Hudson Collective, said being a woman and a mother has been an integral part of building her business.

Nicole Hudson, the president and founder of Hudson Collective, said being a woman and a mother has been an integral part of building her business.

Photo provided by Hudson Collective

METRO DETROIT — In a society constantly working to bring equality to women in the workplace, consider for a moment an alternative point of view: Women might not always be equal to men because, sometimes, they can do the job better.

That’s reality for Nicole Hudson, the founder and president of Hudson Collective. To boil down what her firm does is tough, but she describes it as a digital strategy and communications service that focuses on social impact and storytelling to drive community action.

In short, Hudson does a lot of public relations and advocacy work, particularly with school districts and education-centered organizations like Chippewa Valley Schools and the Utica Education Association.

Could she do her job as well as she does now if she weren’t a woman? She says definitely not.

“I started my company because I knew what the limitations were on my ambition,” said Hudson, who has a 2-year-old daughter. “How do you have a career and a family and be a mom if it’s not on your own terms? If you don’t control your own schedule and your own choices? There’s no way you can have a life that works for you.”

She launched Hudson Collective eight years ago when, she said, she realized she was working to serve the passions of other business owners instead of her own. Opening her own firm gave her the opportunity to connect with clients and work on projects that fulfilled her, instead of just earning her a paycheck.

“I don’t have time to pursue all of the things I would like, so (my job) has to serve double and triple duty. How would I spend my hours and what would I do, even if I weren’t paid to do it?” she said.

That formula has been successful for Hudson, and her list of clients is long and filled with organizations that benefit from her enthusiasm and, often, her female frame of mind.

Where Hudson is driven by messaging for her customers, Danielle Workman is driven by numbers.

Well, it’s a bit more complicated than that. Workman is a private wealth advisor with Lincoln Financial Advisors Corp., of Southfield, a broker-dealer and registered investment advisor.

She’s also a mom of three — and a widow. That experience has motivated her to help all her clients and, in particular, women who could benefit from her holistic approach to estate planning, tax reduction strategies, educational funding and unplanned events like the death of a loved one or a divorce.

To tailor that experience for each client, Workman said, the first thing she asks when she meets someone is about their earliest memories about money. Their first money story — if they saved up to buy a bike, if they’d lost the parent — because that often lays the foundational groundwork about their financial beliefs.

Using your past to inform your future career moves has been an important part of Hudson’s climb to success. And for those who want to do the same, she advised that they figure out what that passion is — and then associate themselves with like-minded people.

“If you’re a parent, of course go to your local PTA meetings. If you’re interested in (a political cause) even if you’re just joining groups on social media, just start meeting people and making those connections,” she said. “Find the people who care about what you care about, and that can empower you to find a place for yourself.”