Students and residents gather at the Boulan Park tennis courts March 25 to play tennis. The courts will soon be resurfaced to fix cracks that have formed in the asphalt.

Students and residents gather at the Boulan Park tennis courts March 25 to play tennis. The courts will soon be resurfaced to fix cracks that have formed in the asphalt.

Photo by Jonathan Shead


Troy council approves funds to resurface Boulan Park tennis courts

By: Jonathan Shead | Troy Times | Published April 8, 2021

 Cracked asphalt at the Boulan Park tennis courts will soon be replaced with a new resurfacing, including new nets and posts, after City Council approved the roughly $225,000 expenditure.

Cracked asphalt at the Boulan Park tennis courts will soon be replaced with a new resurfacing, including new nets and posts, after City Council approved the roughly $225,000 expenditure.

Photo by Jonathan Shead

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TROY — The Boulan Park tennis courts will be getting a face-lift.

As part of its consent agenda March 22, City Council members unanimously approved a motion for funding to resurface the eight tennis courts currently at Boulan Park. The courts were last resurfaced in 2006 and have begun to crack, Troy Facilities and Grounds Operations Manager Dennis Trantham said.

“We’re kind of trying to get ahead of the potential damage of the future,” Trantham said, adding that the work is needed now, but it’s also preemptive. “Once tennis courts start cracking, they don’t stop. Once any asphalt starts cracking, it doesn’t stop. It just continues to crack.”

The city sent out notices to 384 companies to bid on the project beginning March 4. They received four bids back and went with the lowest bidder, S&J Asphalt Paving Co. of Canton. The project is estimated to cost $224,850 and will not exceed $275,000. Funds for the project will come from the park development capital fund.

A two-year contract is included in the project bid as a way to hold the contractor accountable for a couple of years after completion, Trantham explained.

Residents may not be surprised to hear of the resurfacing project. Trantham said maintaining the city’s existing parks and recreation amenities was a high priority in both the city’s Parks and Recreation Master Plan and feedback received from residents in a recent survey.

“We’re truly just trying to maintain what we have before we go and try to construct more,” Trantham said.

He said tennis court use and park attendance at Boulan Park have always been in high demand in general, but they have increased some due to the pandemic. “They’re pretty heavily used. Especially with COVID this past year, it seems like they were used even more. People were looking for an opportunity to get outside,” Trantham said, adding that the Troy School District and the Troy Community Center both use the courts for programming at times as well.

“The courts are used almost all the time when weather is reasonable,” Troy Interim Recreation Director Brian Goul wrote in an email. “Particularly at night.”

Goul believes the Community Center will see benefits from the new courts when they’re used for spring break tennis camps, as much as individual players will see improvements when they use it.

The tennis courts will be ripped down back to the subbase, tearing out all the asphalt. The subbase will be checked to see if it needs maintenance, and then all the other components will be built back up from there.

“You have two different types of asphalt. You have a leveling course, and then a tennis court top-wearing course. Then your color coating materials, which is basically your acrylic paint, and then your net posts and center tie-downs,” S&J Asphalt Project Manager and Estimator Marc Olds said, adding that S&J Asphalt will be completing all of the work, from asphalt to new nets.

Under good winter weather conditions, Olds said, new asphalt could last 10-15 years, but if the courts experience harsh winters, it may expedite new damage in the future. Overall, Olds is happy to be working on the project.

“It’s great. These bids are like a one-hand poker deal. It takes a long time to prepare them, so when you’re low on them and you’re confident in how you bid the job and how you put together the bid, it’s a good feeling,” he said. “Then you get to build it and see it all take place. To get awarded a project and then to see it through from start to finish and hand over somebody a finished product that everybody’s happy with, that’s the reward of the job.”

Construction schedules at the tennis courts will be tentative and weather dependent, Trantham said, but crews are expected to begin work the week of April 19. The courts are estimated to be restored and reopened sometime between June 10 and 15.

For more information, visit troymi.gov.

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