Nicholas Bahri, left, is led into a courtroom at the start of his trial on April 14 in Mount Clemens.

Nicholas Bahri, left, is led into a courtroom at the start of his trial on April 14 in Mount Clemens.

Photo by Brian Wells


Trial begins for man accused of killing 3 over drugs, money

Victims were Warren man, his girlfriend and 6-year-old son

By: Brian Wells | Warren Weekly | Published April 14, 2022

 Photographs of Tukoyo Moore, his son Tai'raz Moore, 6, and Tukoyo's girlfriend, Isis Rimson, are displayed as Macomb County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Carmen DeFranco makes his opening statements in the trial of Nicholas Bahri.

Photographs of Tukoyo Moore, his son Tai'raz Moore, 6, and Tukoyo's girlfriend, Isis Rimson, are displayed as Macomb County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Carmen DeFranco makes his opening statements in the trial of Nicholas Bahri.

Photo by Brian Wells

 A photo of Nicholas Bahri holding stacks of money is displayed as Macomb County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Carmen DeFranco makes his opening statements in Bahri's trial April 14.

A photo of Nicholas Bahri holding stacks of money is displayed as Macomb County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Carmen DeFranco makes his opening statements in Bahri's trial April 14.

Photo by Brian Wells

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MOUNT CLEMENS — Family and friends of Tukoyo Moore, Isis Rimson and Tai’raz Moore, 6, filled a courtroom at Macomb County Circuit Court April 14 as the trial for the man who allegedly murdered them began.

Nicholas Bahri is accused of killing Tukoyo Moore, Rimson — Moore’s girlfriend — and Tai’raz Moore, Tukoyo’s son, over drugs and money in the fall of 2020. He is facing a total of 15 charges, including multiple counts of first-degree murder and felony weapons offenses, in addition to a third-degree arson charge and one count of disinterment and mutilation of a dead body.

As Macomb County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Carmen DeFranco began his opening statements, photographs of the three victims were displayed on a television screen. He began by painting a portrait of the people allegedly killed by Bahri.

Tai’raz Moore liked boxing and pizza. The night before he died, he was excited about losing his first front teeth, Geraldine Bell, Tukoyo Moore’s grandmother, said.

But he died before he could lose them, she said.

Rimson had her own daughter. She had just started a fashion business where people could order clothes online.

“This defendant decided that their lives did not mean enough to him when he decided that what he wanted in his life is more important than every one of their lives,” DeFranco said.

DeFranco told jurors that Bahri’s greed and contemptuous feelings towards the victims are what caused him to murder them. At one point, a photo of Bahri that was reportedly found on a cellphone, taken the day after the murder, showed him holding a large amount of cash.

That, DeFranco said, was worth more to Bahri than the lives of Tukoyo and Tai’raz Moore and Rimson.

As DeFranco explained the types of injuries and the cause of death of Rimson and Tai’raz Moore, many of the family members in the courtroom became emotional. They were found in defensive poses, each having sustained multiple gunshot wounds.

DeFranco argued that the murders were premeditated because there was plenty of time for Bahri to think about what he was doing.

“It’s not spur of the moment because there are multiple gunshot wounds to those two people in that basement,” he said. “It takes time to pull each trigger.”

Bahri’s Attorney, Lee O’Brien, talked about Tukoyo Moore’s relationship with his client. They were best friends, he said, but what police found when they searched each of their homes told two different stories.

When police searched Tukoyo Moore’s home they reportedly found different kinds of ammunition and weapons, and paperwork in his handwriting about the consequences of murdering somebody. There reportedly were also items that could be used in selling narcotics such as scales, money counters and large piles of cash and items used to produce drugs.

Bahri, O’Brien said, lived with his parents. When his house was searched, they reportedly found paperwork from the Michigan Department of Corrections stating that he was a felon, medications and medical marijuana being grown in the basement. They would also receive paperwork for a gun that was recently purchased by Bahri’s father-in-law.

“I think it shows the difference in the type of people we’re talking about here,” O’Brien said. “One guy I guess you could say screams hawk and the other screams pigeon.”

At the end of his opening statement, O’Brien said police were rushed and didn’t solve the case properly.

“It all could have been avoided if the chief of police of Warren didn’t jump on TV and talk about this case and solve it prematurely,” he said. “It’s really a tragedy, this whole thing.”

Around 2 a.m. on Oct. 1, 2020, Moore was found dead of a gunshot wound inside a burning rental car by Detroit police detectives, who were able to track the vehicle back to Moore’s address in Warren.

When investigators arrived at the home and found the door ajar, Warren police were contacted. Inside, in the basement of the house, they found the bodies of Rimson and Tai’raz Moore. Both reportedly suffered gunshot wounds.

Investigators said the home was ransacked but drugs, weapons and a large amount of hidden cash were found during a search after the bodies were discovered.

An investigation led police to Bahri’s home in West Bloomfield. Police believe Moore was last known to be alive in the driveway of that house, arriving at the address before leaving with Bahri shortly after 8 p.m. on Sept. 30, 2020.

Bahri was arrested at his home on Oct. 9, 2020.

If he’s found guilty of first-degree murder, Bahri faces mandatory life in prison.

In a pretrial hearing held April 6, O’Brien told Servitto he expected the trial to take about three weeks. More than 20 witnesses were expected to be called.

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