A cyclist rides down the new Sylvan Glen Lake Park Trail Dec. 7.

A cyclist rides down the new Sylvan Glen Lake Park Trail Dec. 7.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Sylvan Glen Lake Park trail open

By: Eric Czarnik | Troy Times | Published December 8, 2020

 Sylvan Glen Lake Park is home to a new non-motorized trail in Troy.

Sylvan Glen Lake Park is home to a new non-motorized trail in Troy.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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TROY — Troy locals will be able to walk in a winter wonderland soon at a new trail at Sylvan Glen Lake Park.

City officials recently announced the trail’s completion as part of finishing phase two of their Troy trails initiative, following the phase-one opening of a trail near Daisy Knight Dog Park a couple of years ago.

Officials said the Sylvan Glen Lake Park trail is about a mile long. It connects Rochester Road to a westward subdivision.

The city will maintain the new trail this winter so people can walk or bike on it all year. Officials say people are welcome to check out the new trail now, though the city expects to formally celebrate with a ribbon-cutting ceremony this spring or summer.

Troy Department of Public Works Director Kurt Bovensiep explained that the city has been planning to improve its trail system for a long time, adding that three of the latest parks and recreation master plans reference the idea. In addition, city officials said, the city’s Green Space Subcommittee also recommended it.

Bovensiep said design work on the Sylvan Glen Lake Park trail started about a year ago, though there were some stumbling blocks along the way, such as COVID-19 and the permitting process.

“It did cross a bit of a wetland, so that took some additional time to get the permit approved before we could get that project out to bid for construction,” he said, adding that the permit came from the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.

Bovensiep estimated the Sylvan Glen Lake Park trail project’s cost at about $500,000. He described how the new trail spotlights the city’s woods and natural environment.

“We really want to concentrate on highlighting the natural features of the city,” he said. “It goes into the wooded area. Once you get back in the wooded area, you’d never guess that you were in the middle of Troy. It’s really dense. You won’t see any houses.”

As far as what happens next for the city’s trails program, Bovensiep said the next area the city plans to focus on is Jaycee Park, forging a trail that could go northward to a new subdivision.

“We just started preliminary work in that area,” he said.

But he added that there’s much more trail work to be done, and as far as the city is concerned, “there’s phase forever.”

“The City Council has decided this to be a priority. It’s seen in all of our surveys. It’s a top priority of our residents,” he said. “City Council, at least in the next three years, will allocate $750,000 each year toward the trails and pathways.”

Troy Mayor Ethan Baker said he is excited to see the trails’ Segment 2 open and believes residents will love it just as much as Segment 1. He thanked city staff for their work on the projects.

“Winding along Sylvan Glen Lake and through a beautiful wooded area, Troy’s beauty and serenity is highlighted,” he said in a text message. “Our residents have consistently expressed their support for the building of these trails and we are looking forward to adding more segments in the near future!”

Sylvan Glen Lake Park is located at 5501 Rochester Road, south of Square Lake Road in Troy. Find out more about Troy and its parks and trails by visiting www.troymi.gov.

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