A sidewalk rests atop a new bridge over the Evans Branch of the Rouge River on Nine Mile Road, between Lahser and Telegraph roads. The road was closed for a year during the $8 million project.

A sidewalk rests atop a new bridge over the Evans Branch of the Rouge River on Nine Mile Road, between Lahser and Telegraph roads. The road was closed for a year during the $8 million project.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Nine Mile bridge in Southfield complete after $8 million renovation

By: Kayla Dimick | Southfield Sun | Published June 11, 2019

 Officials said the elevation of the bridge was raised by 8 feet to prevent flooding.

Officials said the elevation of the bridge was raised by 8 feet to prevent flooding.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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SOUTHFIELD — It has been closed for an entire year, but now residents can finally make their way over the Nine Mile Road bridge.

On June 5, residents and city officials gathered for a ribbon cutting to officially open the road, which had been under construction since June 18, 2018.

“This is a very auspicious occasion, especially for those of us who live on the south end of Southfield and had to — for over a year — make detours a mile this way and a mile that way,” Mayor Ken Siver said. “We have been waiting for this day, and I’m very, very pleased that we now have a new bridge and a completed roadway on this $8 million project.”

The road underwent a massive transformation: namely, the removal and replacement of the bridge over the Evans Branch of the Rouge River.

Officials said the elevation of the bridge was raised by 8 feet to prevent flooding, and the water main at that location was relocated to better accommodate the bridge work.

“Those of you who are familiar with the terrain here know that we had a big dip in the road, and so the bridge needed to be replaced, but we were also looking at the future,” Siver said. “We know with climate change we’ve had some severe rain events. I can remember times where this whole area of the golf course was covered in water, so it was critical for us to make sure people could safely traverse this road in a big rain event and the bridge would not be washing out on them or disappearing.”

Crews also transformed the road into three lanes — one in each direction and a center left-turn lane.

The pavement on the road was also rehabilitated. Around 5 feet of new asphalt and concrete curbs were added, along with a new sidewalk. A portion of the sanitary sewer, east of Plum Hollow Street, was replaced.

City Administrator Fred Zorn said that the $8 million project was funded with $4.8 million in federal and state funds, and $3.2 million was used from the city’s $99 million road bond fund.

“I think it’s interesting today that a major piece of infrastructure is opening up on the 75th anniversary of D-Day,” Zorn said. “One of the things we learned after World War II was the importance of infrastructure, and our need and desire to mobilize the country. Out of that came the growth of the suburban community, and that’s Southfield — one of the first-ring suburban communities, and that drives our location as the ‘Center of It All.’”

Dan’s Excavating, led by Project Manager Clint McDonald, built the road. Hubble, Roth and Clark designed and inspected it.

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