Kostiuk steps in as BHS interim superintendent

By: Tiffany Esshaki | Birmingham - Bloomfield Eagle | Published June 4, 2019

 Bloomfield Hills Schools Board of Education member Christina “Tina” Kostiuk will step in as interim superintendent July 1.

Bloomfield Hills Schools Board of Education member Christina “Tina” Kostiuk will step in as interim superintendent July 1.

Photo provided by Bloomfield Hills Schools

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BLOOMFIELD HILLS — With Robert Glass on his way to join family in New York, the Bloomfield Hills Schools district needed to put someone at the helm while it searched for a permanent superintendent.

The BHS Board of Education appointed one of its own to take on the task May 23. Board member Christina Kostiuk will fill the superintendent role temporarily beginning July 1.

A certified public accountant, Kostiuk joined BHS in 2011 as the assistant superintendent for business services, overseeing financial operations, with the district’s funds totaling more than $100 million. She also serves as the treasurer for the Bloomfield Hills Schools Foundation and in 2014 was awarded the Oakland County School Business Officials Business Administrator of the Year award, then served as president of that organization during the 2015-16 school year.

It’s a lengthy list of responsibilities and accomplishments that made her the natural choice to step in as superintendent, according to Board of Education President Paul Kolin.

“We have complete confidence in her leadership. There needs to be someone the buck stops with, and I think (Kostiuk) will excel in that role,” he said.

Glass will head to New York this summer as his wife accepts an executive position in the fashion industry. He too said Kostiuk is a great choice to serve in his stead.

“Tina will do a beautiful job supporting the district and continuing to move forward,” he said in a prepared statement. “She has been a tremendous colleague — it’s been my absolute pleasure to work alongside her.”

The months in between the last day of school and the first are pivotal to shaping the direction of the district, Kostiuk said.

“Over the summer months, our leadership team individually and collaboratively plans and prepares for tasks and initiatives ahead. There is incredible energy during the first week all of the staff are back in the fall, and a lot of it stems from the time and space summer provides for planning and preparation,” Kostiuk said in an email. “I’ll be here to support and guide that work until the Board of Education finds the right fit for our community.”

Ideally, that would be completed by the time school resumes around Labor Day. But the task of choosing a new leader is long and detailed, particularly when the net for candidates will be cast nationally and the right fit might need to relocate. Narrowing that field of candidates involves input from experts and community members alike. The board is scheduled to select a search firm during its June 5 meeting.

“We’ll be working with the search firm to map out the process, get input from the community and educators across the board and work with them on that process. The search firm we’ll be going through will host a series of town hall meetings where anyone who has any feedback can share that with our school board,” Kolin said. “So far, (the board) has gone to some Parent Teacher Organization meetings to hear about what they want in a superintendent. But we want to engage all stakeholders in the community, not just parents.”

You won’t find Kostiuk’s résumé in the lot of applicants for that permanent superintendent position, though. She said she enjoys her role overseeing the district’s finances and looks forward to serving with whomever gets the job.

In the meantime, her goal is to just carry Glass’ torch to the finish line.

“While every leader hopes for a ‘quiet’ road, we have a lot of work ahead of us that was already carefully planned through Dr. Glass’ leadership. I plan to support the entire leadership team and staff across the district in continuing to walk that path throughout the summer,” she said.

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