The other section of road added to the program is Hereford Road from Dundee Road to the city limit of Royal Oak. This is the intersection of Hereford and Dundee.

The other section of road added to the program is Hereford Road from Dundee Road to the city limit of Royal Oak. This is the intersection of Hereford and Dundee.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Huntington Woods adds streets to repair in road improvement program

By: Mike Koury | Woodward Talk | Published April 29, 2022

 Sections of two streets in Huntington Woods were added to the city’s 2022 Road Improvement Program, including Dundee Road from Hereford Road to Hendrie Boulevard. Seen here is a part of Dundee at Hereford facing north toward Hendrie.

Sections of two streets in Huntington Woods were added to the city’s 2022 Road Improvement Program, including Dundee Road from Hereford Road to Hendrie Boulevard. Seen here is a part of Dundee at Hereford facing north toward Hendrie.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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HUNTINGTON WOODS — The city of Huntington Woods will be adding a couple of streets to repair as part of its road improvement program.

At its April 19 meeting, the Huntington Woods City Commission voted 4-0 to approve the addition of two street sections for its 2022 Road Improvement Program.

The two streets added to the program were Hereford Road from Dundee Road to the city limit of Royal Oak and Dundee Road from Hereford Road to Hendrie Boulevard.

City Manager Chris Wilson stated that Hereford and Dundee were selected because Huntington Woods had additional funds available to add the streets, as well as that the streets are in close proximity to Royal Oak.

“Royal Oak is also going to be working on their portions of those roads, which are the concrete sections on their side, and our portions were in particularly poor shape,” he said. “I know (they’re) not the only sections in the city that are in poor shape, but with the work going to be done in Royal Oak, we’re trying to minimize the impact on residents, and when they got their concrete done, our asphalt is going to look even worse. So we’re trying to incorporate that into the project for this year to be efficient, and we are looking at many other sections to be doing in the current year. I thought that was most advantageous.”

According to the city, the final cost projections have yet to be determined because the engineers haven’t completed the final designs for these streets, but the initial projections calculate that the additional work could be done for an amount not to exceed $600,000.

Wilson stated that the city was not looking to do water main work at this time with the streets, only road reconstruction.

The streets that already were designated to be improved as part of the program were Borgman Avenue from Scotia Road to Meadowcrest Boulevard; Nadine Avenue from Coolidge Highway to Berkley Avenue; Wyoming Road from Borgman to 11 Mile Road; Lasalle Boulevard from Meadowcrest to Wyoming; and Wyoming from Vernon Avenue to Nadine.

Commissioner Michelle Elder brought up how some of the PASER ratings for the roads were done prior to the winter, and how some sections have quickly deteriorated after salting.

“There’s one section specifically on Hendrie heading into the city, and it being the front-facing road of kind of the gateway into our city, it’s pretty much kind of like the crater of the moon at this point,” she said. “Public Works did go out and fill in the potholes, which helped tremendously.”

Wilson noted that the roads never get better, only worse, and that there probably are some roads that have had their PASER numbers slip down, but the city is going at the roads aggressively to repair them.

“I think you saw in the budget the amount of money that we’re putting into the roads this year, and the community’s been supportive of that,” he said. “The need’s there. Definitely driving around (Huntington Woods), the need is there, but we do (need to) reevaluate that. We probably wouldn’t do a full PASER analysis for a couple of years, but those PASER documents, they’re living documents. They’re meant to be updated on an annual basis, and this is frankly the time of year to do that.”

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