The Southfield City Council recently approved a plan for a golf recreation center with a lighted driving range.

The Southfield City Council recently approved a plan for a golf recreation center with a lighted driving range.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Golf recreation center in the works ‘fore’ 10-acre plot in Southfield

By: Kayla Dimick | Southfield Sun | Published August 11, 2020

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SOUTHFIELD — Golf aficionados will soon have a new place to tee off after a recent plan was approved by the Southfield City Council.

During a July 27 meeting held via teleconference, the council unanimously approved a plan for a golf recreation center with a restaurant, banquet facilities, meeting rooms, a lighted driving range and a parking lot on 10.7 acres of land in the city.

The facility will be located on the north side of 12 Mile Road, between Inkster Road and Northwestern Highway.

The three-story building will also include a driving range on the north side of the property, with a restaurant and a dropoff area on the south end.

The request came from Scott Riddle, the owner of Scott Riddle, Inc.

“We are truly excited to bring this tremendous development to the community,” Riddle said during the meeting.  “We think this multioperational venue for sports and family and group gatherings is an exciting new piece to the community.”

Riddle said the facility will cater to many different people. Whether they like to hit golf balls first thing in the morning or they’re more night owls, the facility will be able to meet those needs.

The hours of operation will be 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays, he said, and 7 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.

Resident Donald Smith, of the San Marino Villas Homeowners Association, said residents are concerned about the amount of traffic that the golf center will bring.

“We have concerns about the driveway that is going to be coming in and out. We’re very concerned that is going to create a very serious problem right at the entrance of our subdivision,” Smith said.  “Secondly, we’re concerned about the possibility of cut-through traffic coming through our very quiet subdivision. We have no traffic lights, very few street lights and lots of children.”

Lauren Warren, a supervising traffic engineer at WSP USA, a transportation engineering firm, said that cut-through traffic shouldn’t be an issue in the area.

“There really isn’t a good access point to cut through that subdivision to get to a major roadway. Most people are trying to get back to Northwestern or 12 Mile,” she said. “I personally don’t see much benefit of cutting through. It would make more sense to go over to Inkster to access whatever road you needed to.”

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