Ten of the 11 pregnant nurses ham it up before or after their shifts in the Family Birth Center at Beaumont Hospital, Troy.

Ten of the 11 pregnant nurses ham it up before or after their shifts in the Family Birth Center at Beaumont Hospital, Troy.

Photo provided by Beaumont Health


Eleven pregnant nurses deliver care in labor and delivery unit in Troy

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published January 29, 2019

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TROY — Eleven nurses helping mothers, brand-new babies and families in the Family Birth Center at Beaumont Hospital, Troy, are in the family way themselves.

Delivery dates begin in February and continue through Aug. 1. Hometowns range from Ferndale to North Branch.

Jennifer Buccellato, the administrative nurse manager for the Family Birth Center, said that in October she had “a little bit of anxiety” as 11 nurses advised her of their pregnancies. She started a spreadsheet to work through the staffing.

“There’s no issue,” she said of keeping the staff levels up.

For three of the nurses, this is their first baby. Two nurses have scheduled their C-sections on the same day. One is expecting twins.

Buccellato said she guessed it was difficult for the pregnant nurses to keep it a secret at first, before they disclosed their pregnancies.

“We had three baby showers within one week,” she laughed. “It’s a lot of fun.”

“It was harder at first, having nausea,” said nurse Katie Hoenle, of Macomb Township. Her due date is April 17. She and her husband, Patrick, have a son, Luke, age 2.

Hoenle works midnights. She’s worked on the labor and delivery floor for eight years.

“We helped each other out and to cover our patients and made sure we all took care of each other,” Hoenle said.

It’s been a little bit easier for her now that the morning sickness has passed. Her morning sickness was actually very early morning sickness and usually kicked in during her shift at around 4 a.m. “Your body has been up too long, and it’s confused (by the time).”

She said the patients have been supportive of their pregnant nurses. “It’s funny how much they empathize with you when they find out you’re in the same situation.

“The hardest part now is the fatigue and exhaustion,” Hoenle said. “Coffee is your best friend. I only drink it at work. We ask each other, ‘Do you need coffee? I’m going,’” she laughed.

“It’s a really good group of ladies,” she added. “It’s cool to share the bond we have and see the differences how everybody reacts and feels.”

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