A reproduction of “The Lily Pond,” painted in 1886 by Charles Harry Eaton, stands next to the pond on the Shelby Township municipal campus last week. The Detroit Institute of Arts recently installed reproductions of works from its collection in seven communities across Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties, including Shelby Township.

A reproduction of “The Lily Pond,” painted in 1886 by Charles Harry Eaton, stands next to the pond on the Shelby Township municipal campus last week. The Detroit Institute of Arts recently installed reproductions of works from its collection in seven communities across Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties, including Shelby Township.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


DIA Inside|Out art program showcases reproductions in Shelby Township

By: Kara Szymanski | Shelby - Utica News | Published August 5, 2019

 An 1857 work of art called “Talking Oak,” by William Maw Egley,  makes for a striking sight along the trail on the municipal campus.

An 1857 work of art called “Talking Oak,” by William Maw Egley, makes for a striking sight along the trail on the municipal campus.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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SHELBY TOWNSHIP — A special art display has made Shelby Township its home for a short period of time for the public to visit and admire.

During the week of July 29, the Detroit Institute of Arts installed high-quality reproductions of works of art from the museum’s collection in seven communities across Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties, including Shelby Township.

The display in Shelby Township was installed July 29 outdoors on the municipal campus.

The works of art will be on display until October for visitors to take pictures with and view.

“There are nine high-quality replicas from the DIA’s collection that have been installed throughout Shelby Township,” Megan Hawthorne, the DIA regional public relations manager, said in an email.

She said they are located throughout Shelby Township at the following locations:

• Shelby Township Hall-north entrance.

• The band shell.

• The Hope Chapel.

• The Andrews Schoolhouse.

• Shelby Township Hall-west entrance.

• The final four pieces are located along the walking path.

This is the 10th year that the Detroit Institute of Arts has brought works of art by well-known artists to several communities for the opportunity to see them close to home. The DIA estimates that tens of thousands of people have enjoyed the outdoor works of art during those 10 years.

“There are a variety of different pieces from the museum’s collection — not just one type of art topic. The community picks the location for the art to be installed, and the museum’s Inside|Out team selects pieces from the Inside|Out collection that fit the environment of the chosen location,” Hawthorne said.

She said there is no cost to the community to install the pieces.

Salvador Salort-Pons, the DIA director, said the program is a way to engage with residents in their own communities.

“The Inside|Out program allows us a unique way to engage with tri-county residents by bringing art from the DIA into the communities in which they live,” Salort-Pons said in a prepared statement. “For a decade, this program has been bringing culture and history that must be experienced in person to the communities we serve, providing an experience that cannot be found on TV or the internet.”

Lynn Wilhelm, who is a township trustee and a liaison for the Parks and Recreation and Solid Waste and Recycling committees, said it’s a great opportunity for both the community and the DIA.

“We are honored to be able to showcase the DIA Inside|Out artworks in our community. We will feature these on our beautiful campus. I think it is a great opportunity to not only support the DIA, but also promote our community of beauty and culture that some people may not be aware of. It is the first of many unique ideas that the DDA has to highlight our fantastic community. I think it is a win for both of us!” Wilhelm stated in an email.

For more information, visit www.dia.org.

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