Col. Steven Carozza was the guest speaker at Clinton Township’s annual Veterans Day Ceremony at Resurrection Cemetery Nov. 11. He noted that the U.S. military is nothing without the people who choose to serve, representing the nation’s  greatest strength.

Col. Steven Carozza was the guest speaker at Clinton Township’s annual Veterans Day Ceremony at Resurrection Cemetery Nov. 11. He noted that the U.S. military is nothing without the people who choose to serve, representing the nation’s greatest strength.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Community gathers for Clinton Township Veterans Day ceremony

By: Alex Szwarc | C&G Newspapers | Published November 17, 2021

 Clinton Township’s George Schulle, a Vietnam War veteran, renders the military salute at the Veterans Day ceremony.

Clinton Township’s George Schulle, a Vietnam War veteran, renders the military salute at the Veterans Day ceremony.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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CLINTON TOWNSHIP — It was fitting that one of America’s premier memorials was referenced on a day that honors military veterans.  

Clinton Township hosted its annual Veterans Day Ceremony at Resurrection Cemetery Nov. 11.

The event was open to the public and took place at the American Veterans’ Memorial.

Col. Steven Carozza was the guest speaker. He is the Chief of Staff at U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command, Life Cycle Management Command in Warren. He began his Army career with the 82nd Airborne Division. Carozza served as company commander of the 23rd Ordnance Company and later as commander of the 16th Ordnance Battalion.

“There is no place I would rather be right now than here with you all, recognizing the accomplishments and sacrifices of the millions of veterans who served our great republic over the years,” he said.

Carozza, the son of a Vietnam War veteran, commented that the U.S. military is nothing without the people who choose to serve, representing the nation’s greatest strength.

“Honoring those who have stepped up to serve our nation, volunteering to put themselves in harm’s way, putting their lives on hold, enduring hardship and separation from their families is why we set this day aside,” he said.

He took time to discuss the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington National Cemetery.

“That tomb stands as a solemn reminder of the ultimate sacrifice some of our soldiers and veterans have made,” he explained. “Their sacrifice will endure as long as the nation endures.”

Going to the tomb as a child, Carozza said what struck him was watching the changing of the guard and the professionalism of the soldiers.

“The precision and the dedication it takes to protect, defend and recognize the sacrifice  of that soldier, who no one will know, struck me and has sat with me my entire career,” he said. “The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a memorial that inspires reflection on service, valor and sacrifice.”

Prior to the ceremony, Carozza told C & G Newspapers that he serves because he wants to serve.

“I feel like I owe something to the nation, not the other way around,” he said. “Appreciation and continued support is a little bit different than just saying thanks.”

The colonel added that it’s good when civilians interact with veterans.

“Understand what it is we do every day, why we do it and what the stories are,” Carozza said. “Every veteran has a different story for why they did what they did.”

Describing the veteran community, he noted there is a special connection that always exists.

Clinton Township Supervisor Bob Cannon said veterans unselfishly and willfully placed their safety and sometimes their lives in jeopardy.

“Our veterans have protected our freedoms, have given us security from our enemies and preserved the greatest nation ever to exist,” he said. “These men and women were ordinary people until they heard the call to serve and answered it.”

U.S. Rep. Andy Levin, D-Bloomfield Township, attended and made remarks at the ceremony.

“I love this day and consider it to be one of the most important days of the year as an American,” he said. “Today and every Veterans Day, Americans stand united in reflecting upon the heroism of those who died in the service of our country and are reminded to continue to support and honor the veterans who walk among us.”

Levin serves Macomb County and portions of Oakland County in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 154 and other honored guests were part of the ceremony.

Next month, Resurrection Cemetery invites the public to Wreaths Across America Day, set for noon on Dec. 18.

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