A framed reproduction of “Ford Rouge Plant (from Dix Rd. Bridge)” (1997), by Russ Marshall, is one of the pieces from the Detroit Institute of Arts’ collection currently on display at Catalpa Oaks County Park in Southfield as part of the DIA’s Inside|Out exhibit.

A framed reproduction of “Ford Rouge Plant (from Dix Rd. Bridge)” (1997), by Russ Marshall, is one of the pieces from the Detroit Institute of Arts’ collection currently on display at Catalpa Oaks County Park in Southfield as part of the DIA’s Inside|Out exhibit.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


DIA brings art to Southfield municipal campus, Catalpa Oaks, other parks

By: Andy Kozlowski | Southfield Sun | Published July 27, 2022

 “Mother and Child” (1960s), by Solomon Irein Wangboje, is another piece appearing as a framed reproduction at Catalpa Oaks County Park. In addition to these, there are seven pieces from the DIA at Southfield’s municipal campus, from now through early November.

“Mother and Child” (1960s), by Solomon Irein Wangboje, is another piece appearing as a framed reproduction at Catalpa Oaks County Park. In addition to these, there are seven pieces from the DIA at Southfield’s municipal campus, from now through early November.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

SOUTHFIELD — The Detroit Institute of Arts is partnering with Southfield to bring high-quality reproductions of famous art pieces to city properties as part of the DIA’s Inside|Out program.

The DIA is also teaming up with Oakland County Parks and Recreation to bring artwork to Catalpa Oaks County Park, located at 27705 Greenfield Road in Southfield.

Seven of the pieces are at the municipal campus, at 26000 Evergreen Road.

These include “Bookshop: Hebrew Books, Holy Day Books” (1953), by Ben Shahn, at Civic Center Park Pavilion No. 1; “Hard Ball III” (1993), by Robert Moskowitz, at the Southfield Sports Arena Ice Rink; “Interior of St. Peter’s, Rome” (1750), by Giovanni Paolo Panini, at the 46th District Court; “The Palms Parade Crowd” (1964), by Russ Marshall, at the Police Memorial Garden; “Cotopaxi” (1862), by Frederic Edwin Church, at the Southfield Parks and Recreation Department; “Rounded Flower Bed” (1876), by Claude Monet, at the Veterans’ Memorial Garden; and “Untitled” (1980), by Edouard Duval-Carrié, at the Southfield Public Library.

“The Inside|Out program is not only a great way to showcase some of the DIA’s most famous masterpieces, but also the beauty of the city of Southfield as the perfect backdrop,” said Michael Manion, the city’s community relations director, in an email. “We are very excited to be able to bring art to public places thanks to this innovative cultural arts program. The program also nicely complements the city’s many other public art initiatives, from the 6th annual Southfield Photo Prize currently taking place, to the numerous new public art installations springing up throughout the city.”

At Catalpa Oaks County Park, one can find “Mother and Child” (1960s), by Solomon Irein Wangboje; and “Ford Rouge Plant (from Dix Rd. Bridge)” (1997), by Russ Marshall, located around the perimeter of the walking path on the north and south sides.

“The pieces are exact replicas of the original works, in frames made of weatherproof material, but they look just like the pieces that you would see hanging in galleries at the DIA. It is a very unique and cool visual to see on a trail or on one of our buildings,” Brandy Boyd, the chief of recreation programs and services for Oakland County, said in an email. “Patrons can get up close to the pieces, and really look at them and enjoy them.” 

She explained that Oakland County Parks and Recreation works with a DIA representative to determine which pieces from the DIA’s collection will be shown in the parks. The parks team then decides which location will host each piece.

“It’s very much a collaborative effort with the DIA and internally here at OCPR,” Boyd said. 

More art can be found at other Oakland County parks, including the Red Oaks Nature Center at Suarez Friendship Woods, located at 30300 Hales St. in Madison Heights; Addison Oaks County Park, located at 1480 W. Romeo Road in Leonard; and Independence Oaks County Park, located at 9501 Sashabaw Road in Clarkston.

At the Red Oaks Nature Center, one can find such pieces as “Flowers in a Glass Vase” (1704), by Rachel Ruysch, located in the field along the sidewalk and driveway leading into the park, next to the Little Free Library; and “Bank of the Oise at Auvers” (1890), by Vincent Van Gogh, found along the forest trail just south of the Red Oaks Nature Center’s main entrance.  

The art at Addison Oaks includes “The Trappers’ Return” (1851), by George Caleb Bingham, on the Buhl Lake Loop trailhead at Marker 1; “Girl and Laurel” (1879), by Winslow Homer, by Marker 4 on the same loop, closer to the campground near the new playground; and “Irises and Calla Lilies” (1890-1905), by Maria Oakey Dewing, located at Marker 38. 

And at Independence Oaks, outside the Wint Nature Center, along the safety path leading to the park entrance near the floating dock by Twin Chimneys, one can find “Lovers on a Balcony During Monsoon” (1800s), by an unknown artist; “View of Le Crotoy from Upstream” (1889), by Georges Pierre Seurat; and “Dancers in the Green Room” (1879), by Edgar Degas. 

The displays at Southfield’s municipal campus and in the Oakland County parks are just a fraction of the total displays this summer and fall as part of the DIA’s Inside|Out program. In total, more than 100 locations in the metro Detroit area will be hosting reproductions from the DIA’s collection. Each piece will be on display through early November. 

“The DIA Inside|Out program is a valuable and unique opportunity for the tri-county area,” Boyd said. “Being able to go to a park, or a downtown area or a trail, and be able to enjoy great pieces of artwork with descriptions is awesome.

“The partnership that we have cultivated with the DIA is priceless,” she added. “It’s very cool to be able to showcase the beautiful artwork and our beautiful parks at the same time. I know our residents love it and look forward to seeing the new artwork every year.”

Kenson Siver, the mayor of Southfield, said that he’s pleased to see the exhibit return.

“Inside|Out is truly a great initiative of the Detroit Institute of Arts. It spreads art beyond the walls of the museum and furthers appreciation of the arts,” Siver said via email. “We welcome residents to check out the display at the Civic Center.”