Clinton Township Chippewa Valley’s Ryan Lee has a hold on an opponent from Romeo High during a recent match. Chippewa coach Scott Kolesky expects some of his wrestlers to be participating at the individual finals at Ford Field in March.

Clinton Township Chippewa Valley’s Ryan Lee has a hold on an opponent from Romeo High during a recent match. Chippewa coach Scott Kolesky expects some of his wrestlers to be participating at the individual finals at Ford Field in March.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Chippewa Valley coach opines about the sport of wrestling

By: Mark Vest | Fraser - Clinton Township Chronicle | Published January 23, 2018

 Clinton Township Chippewa Valley’s Latrell Kindle has a hold on the leg of an opponent from Romeo High at a recent match. Earlier this season, Chippewa finished fourth at the Macomb County Invitational Classic.

Clinton Township Chippewa Valley’s Latrell Kindle has a hold on the leg of an opponent from Romeo High at a recent match. Earlier this season, Chippewa finished fourth at the Macomb County Invitational Classic.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

Advertisement

CLINTON TOWNSHIP — “‘There’s nowhere to run; there’s nowhere to hide.’”

That is one of the ways Clinton Township Chippewa Valley coach Scott Kolesky described what it’s like to participate in the sport of wrestling.

Those are some tough words for a tough sport, and from Kolesky’s perspective, there are certain characteristics of wrestling that differentiate it.

“You play a sport like football where there’s 70 or 80 guys on the team, you can blend into the background,” he said. “With wrestling, no matter if it’s practice or a meet, you’re exposed in terms of how hard you’ve been training. Whether your practice partners are beating on you or you’re going into a match in front of the crowd, the other team, and your teammates, everybody sees front and center what you’re about. … The toughest sport brings out the best competitors, and wrestling is a sport that I believe you need to be a true competitor; you need to be a warrior to participate in this sport.”

Senior Nick Zipay described wrestling as a sport that is like no other.

“(It) gives you discipline on and off the mat,” Zipay said. “It makes you really appreciate the little things. It shows you that if you really want something, you have to go out and get it; no one is just going to hand you it. And once you do find victory, it’s the greatest feeling that you don’t get from any other sport.”

For as tough of a sport as wrestling is, Kolesky said there is a saying at Chippewa, and if his wrestlers abide by it, it could help make their task seem a lot less daunting.

“‘Earn your 2 percent every day,’” Kolesky said. “(If) they earn their 2 percent every day, that means they’ve given their 100 percent for the year. … That’s our goal. We know if we do that, the other things should take care of themselves.”

Brandon Badour, Zipay and Connor Montilla captain the Big Reds.

“They’re all having pretty solid seasons and doing all the right things to get better and improve,” Kolesky said. “They’re pulling their weight and doing whatever’s necessary to get their hand raised at the end of a wrestling match.”

Chippewa’s accomplishments this season have included finishing fourth at the Macomb County Invitational Classic in December and runner-up at a couple of other tournaments. At press time, the Big Reds were 1-3 overall and 1-2 in the Macomb Area Conference Red Division.

The wrestling season will culminate at Ford Field in Detroit in March with the individual state finals, and Kolesky expects Chippewa to be represented.

“We feel we have a legitimate shot with a lot of our guys that we expect to see do well (at) the district and regional tournament,” he said. “We expect to be coaching some guys at Ford Field, and if they keep doing what’s necessary, bring some hardware home for (the) 2018 season.”

Advertisement