Clinton Township Chippewa Valley’s Nolan Ciolino takes part in the Cuts for a Cure charitable event in 2017. Chippewa will again host the annual event May 3, with part of the proceeds going to help cancer patients with medical bills.

Clinton Township Chippewa Valley’s Nolan Ciolino takes part in the Cuts for a Cure charitable event in 2017. Chippewa will again host the annual event May 3, with part of the proceeds going to help cancer patients with medical bills.

Photo provided by Dawn Ciolino


Chippewa Valley baseball raising money for cancer

By: Mark Vest | Fraser - Clinton Township Chronicle | Published April 22, 2019

 Clinton Township Chippewa Valley baseball players and coaches participate in last year’s Cuts for a Cure. Part of the proceeds from the annual event go to the Believe Foundation, which helps local families who are struggling with bills stemming from cancer treatments.

Clinton Township Chippewa Valley baseball players and coaches participate in last year’s Cuts for a Cure. Part of the proceeds from the annual event go to the Believe Foundation, which helps local families who are struggling with bills stemming from cancer treatments.

Photo provided by Dawn Ciolino

Advertisement

CLINTON TOWNSHIP — Clinton Township Chippewa Valley baseball players attempting to hit the ball hard and far is a common occurrence during the season, but next month, players will be taking swings for a greater purpose than trying to help win a game.

Chippewa’s baseball program will host its fourth annual Cuts for a Cure May 3, which is a home run derby featuring freshmen, JV and varsity players from Chippewa.

Players sold balls for the event, with part of the proceeds benefiting the Believe Foundation, which helps local families who are struggling with bills stemming from cancer treatments.

Opening ceremonies are at 5 p.m. at Chippewa, with the derby beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Dawn Ciolino is one of the volunteers for the event.

“Whether or not you bought a ticket from the boys, anyone is allowed to come and watch the home run derby,” she said. “And then if anyone wants to try to swing for themselves, they just have to pay $5, and they get five swings to try to hit a home run.”

Ciolino noted how those battling cancer can benefit from financial assistance.

“I think for those families that have to pay those medical bills and still manage to keep their gas on, their electricity on, to get just that little bit (of) help, I think they all really appreciate it,” she said. “And to know that we had a part of that, that gives us a good feeling.”

Chippewa baseball coach Gregg Sadowski discussed how Cuts for a Cure got started.

“We’ve had individuals in our program that have been directly affected by cancer in some way, shape or form, whether they were boys that played here or coaches,” Sadowski said. “And one of the things that we decided when I got here four years ago was that we would start doing something, not only to raise money for our program, but also to get the boys used to doing something for the community and not only for themselves.”

Sadowski said that in the last four years, the program has given over $6,000 to the Believe Foundation, Relay for Life and other charities.

Despite the importance of the cause, the event can be a lighthearted one.

“It’s so much fun,” Ciolino said, noting that food is free at the event. “It’s a very positive atmosphere.”

Those who hit a home run will receive Chippewa apparel.

Advertisement