Troy residents Crystal Harabedian, right, and her husband, George Harabedian, look over the produce at the Troy Farmers Market Oct. 19.

Troy residents Crystal Harabedian, right, and her husband, George Harabedian, look over the produce at the Troy Farmers Market Oct. 19.

File photo by Sean Work


What’s next for Troy in 2019

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published January 9, 2019

 Seasoned salts from vendor Lot’s Wyfe sit on display at the Troy Farmers Market, held in the parking lot of the Troy Public Library, Oct. 19.

Seasoned salts from vendor Lot’s Wyfe sit on display at the Troy Farmers Market, held in the parking lot of the Troy Public Library, Oct. 19.

File photo by Sean Work

TROY — As city leaders ended an eventful 2018, the Troy Times asked them what changes residents can expect in the new year and what officials’ resolutions are for the city.

The Troy Farmers Market debuted in the Troy Public Library parking lot last year, and residents will see it again this year.

“We feel we had a very successful year, and we know there’s room for improvement,” said Cindy Stewart, the city’s community affairs director and the manager of the market.

Stewart said she is hoping to expand the farmers market with “more vendors, more farmers and more customers.”

Public Works Director Kurt Bovensiep said as the new year began that crews were “waiting and ready for snow.”

He said the city will continue to explore viable options to extend phase two of the Troy Trail. The first phase, which starts at the new Daisy Knight Dog Park, on Livernois Road, north of Big Beaver Road, opened in June.

The Troy City Council appointed Frank Nastasi as the chief of the Police Department in October to fill the spot after Police Chief Gary Mayer retired in November. Nastasi said via email that his New Year’s resolution for the department is to “continue to provide a high level of service for the community, always aiming to keep crime rates low and quality of life high. We will do this through attracting, retaining and training great employees, and continually looking for innovative ways to serve the community.”

The Troy Police Department is active on social media, and when asked what followers can expect next, Sgt. Meghan Lehman said via email that the department will “be aiming to highlight crime trends more and will continue to try to use a sense of humor to draw attention to issues and build a connection with the community.”

Last spring, police said they would add a Feline Unit to the department if 10,000 people followed them on Twitter.

They hit that number, and Lehman convinced police administrators to establish the Feline Unit.

In the new year, Lehman said, “Pawfficer Donut vows to eat more treats and meet more Troy kids. She will continue encouraging everyone to be ‘pawsitive.’”

The City Council appointed Mark Miller as city manager in November, following his appointment as interim city manager last March after the council fired former City Manager Brian Kischnick. Kischnick was charged with and pleaded no contest to domestic assault and later pleaded guilty to bribery.

Miller shared his overall professional and personal New Year’s resolutions.

Overall, Miller said, he plans to implement his action plan for the city, a plan he included in his material to the City Council when he applied for the city manager position.

The plan includes “continuing to stabilize staff and ensure professional relationships based on trust, security and transparency; earn the trust of residents through transparency and dissemination of city information; ... continue ethics training for staff to promote a clear expectation of behavior; complete the forensic audit and take corrective action, if needed; facilitate a review and revision of city policies, administrative memorandums and ordinances — examples include harassment, sexual harassment, inappropriate relationships, etc.”

“Ultimately, gain the trust of the residents,” Miller said.

His professional resolution is to complete the International City/County Management Association credentialed manager certification.

According to the ICMA website, “ICMA credentialed managers are professional local government managers qualified by a combination of education and experience, adherence to high standards of integrity, and an assessed commitment to lifelong learning and professional development.”

Miller, who is a fly fisherman, enjoys fishing on the Au Sable River, near Manistee, and in Marquette, where his son, daughter-in-law and granddaughter live. He said his personal New Year’s resolution is to catch a brown trout over 20 inches.