Warren mayor asks state to make City Hall ‘vaccination hub’

By: Brian Louwers | Warren Weekly | Published February 23, 2021

 Warren’s City Hall offers up free COVID-19 testing through a partnership with Wayne State University and food for residents through Forgotten Harvest.

Warren’s City Hall offers up free COVID-19 testing through a partnership with Wayne State University and food for residents through Forgotten Harvest.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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WARREN — Mayor Jim Fouts wants to make Warren’s City Hall a COVID-19 “vaccination hub.”

The mayor received his first dose of the vaccine in late January and was scheduled to get his second shot later this month.

Of Feb. 17, he reached out to Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, Department of Health and Human Services Director Elizabeth Hertel and Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, the state of Michigan’s chief medical executive, citing the use of Warren’s City Hall as a food distribution and COVID-19 testing site during the pandemic.

“Now, it’s my hope we can also help get more vaccines into residents’ arms right here at City Hall,” Fouts said.

The mayor said he was hopeful that continued state and federal efforts would “ramp up additional vaccine production,” and that as a result, easily accessible locations would be needed as vaccination sites.

He said Warren’s City Hall, on Van Dyke Avenue north of 12 Mile Road, has offered food for residents through Forgotten Harvest and free COVID-19 testing through a partnership with Wayne State University.

“I can think of no better location in southern Macomb County than right here at Warren City Hall,” Fouts said. “My administration stands ready to help Governor Whitmer get this important mission accomplished.”

Elsewhere in Macomb County, the Sterling Heights City Council has approved a license agreement to occupy and use the former Sears auto repair center property at Lakeside Mall for drive-thru COVID-19 vaccinations.

According to a release from the city on Feb. 16, officials anticipate that the facility would “play a vital role in meeting the anticipated demand for an estimated 80,000 residents 17 years and older who will seek the vaccination” in the state’s Phase 2 rollout.

Michigan’s interim prioritization guidance for COVID-19 vaccination, updated on Feb. 15, sets an initial operational goal of vaccinating 70% of the state’s people age 16 and older by the end of the year. That’s about 5.6 million people.

The state has prioritized vaccine allocation in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s outlined “phases,” which emphasize the protection of people at the greatest risk of developing severe COVID-19 illness and ensuring the continued operation of the health care system and essential services.

The anticipated start time for beginning Phase 2 vaccinations is July. The phase covers all people ages 16-64 not included in one of three Phase 1 tiers that cover health care workers, long-term care residents and staff, those over 75, prioritized frontline responders, school and childcare staff, correctional staff, agriculture and food processing workers, people 65-74, anyone between 18-64 with a preexisting condition and all remaining essential workers.

For more information visit www.michigan.gov/Coronavirus.

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