The intersections of 13 Mile and Southfield roads, as well as 14 Mile and Southfield roads are set to receive a new slab on concrete. Work began Nov. 2 and is expected to be completed by the end of the month.

The intersections of 13 Mile and Southfield roads, as well as 14 Mile and Southfield roads are set to receive a new slab on concrete. Work began Nov. 2 and is expected to be completed by the end of the month.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Two intersections on Southfield Road to receive new concrete

By: Jacob Herbert | Southfield Sun | Published November 10, 2020

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SOUTHFIELD — One of the most driven-upon roads in the city of Southfield is getting a makeover.

Construction started Nov. 2 on the replacement of two concrete slabs at the intersections of 13 Mile and Southfield roads, as well as at 14 Mile and Southfield roads. 

“Southfield Road, Telegraph and Eight Mile are the three Southfield roads that see the most traffic,” Southfield Mayor Ken Siver said. “With lots of traffic and trucks, the intersections are particularly susceptible to wear and tear.”

The Road Commission for Oakland County has tasked Cipparrone Contracting with completing this construction. In 2020 alone, Cipparrone has done work for Oakland County on Telegraph Road, Williams Lake Road, Grand River Avenue, Joslyn Road, Lone Pine Road, Orchard Lake Road and Cooley Lake Road.

Though the specific cost of the construction was not yet known at press time, the money will come from Oakland County’s operating budget. According to the Road Commission’s senior manager of communications, Craig Bryson, the money for the operating budget comes from the state of Michigan. The state collects money from the gas tax and vehicle registration fees and then divvies it out to counties throughout the state.

“It’s our own money. It’s not coming from the federal government or the local community,” Bryson said. “It’s from our operating budget.”

Cipparrone Contracting estimator Rob Hallerman said the work will be done in two phases. Due to its size, the concrete slab cannot be broken up and replaced in one attempt. It has to be broken up into two phases, meaning one section of the slab will be broken up and replaced before the other.

At press time, Hallerman said phase one had been completed, with phase two expected to be complete by Nov. 11, depending on the weather.

The type of weather plays an important role in deciding when the work can be finished. The fall season often brings cool weather, which means the concrete may take a longer time to cure than it would during the spring and summer months. Work is expected to be completed in late November according to a press release from the Road Commission.

“The good thing is that it’s pretty quick work,” Bryson said. “It’s usually a day or two to remove the old concrete, maybe a day or two to put in the new concrete and then the time it takes to cure. The thing that can affect that is the weather. If it’s raining or it gets really cold, then they might delay it. We should be able to meet that time frame without any problems.”

Residents should expect certain lanes to be barrelled off during construction. While the entire road will not be closed, there will be delays during construction, and all surrounding businesses will still be open.

Siver urged residents to be patient during construction. While the road may be barrelled off with no work being done, the concrete is most likely still curing and cannot be driven on until that process is complete. The mayor called the work temporary but necessary.

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