Southfield company observes Take Your Dog to Work Day

By: Kayla Dimick | Southfield Sun | Published June 26, 2019

 Howell resident Christine Eluskie poses with her 13-year-old foster dog, Rosie, June 21 during Village Green’s Take Your Dog to Work Day event at Pebble Creek Park.

Howell resident Christine Eluskie poses with her 13-year-old foster dog, Rosie, June 21 during Village Green’s Take Your Dog to Work Day event at Pebble Creek Park.

Photo by Deb Jacques

 Jen Kim, of Madison Heights, gives her dog, Lucy, a hug at the event.

Jen Kim, of Madison Heights, gives her dog, Lucy, a hug at the event.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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SOUTHFIELD — A local company took a break from the usual grind to hang out with their furry friends recently, all in the name of charity.

Employees of Village Green, a nationwide apartment management company with headquarters in Southfield, moved their workspace June 21 to Pebble Creek Park in observance of Take Your Dog to Work Day.

The event is headed by Pet Sitters International, an educational organization for pet sitters, and is in its 21st year. The goal of Take Your Dog to Work Day is to not only experience the joy of having your pet by your side, but for workplaces to raise money for local animal organizations.

This year,  employees of Village Green were asked to donate $30 to the Lansing-based nonprofit Animal Placement Bureau, which helps rescue and adopt out animals, and the Live Like Roo Foundation, a nonprofit that provides emotional support and financial assistance to families whose pet faces a cancer diagnosis. In return, the employees got to hang out with their dogs all day.

Village Green also hosted a silent auction, which ran through June 23, to raise funds for the organizations.

Christine Eluskie, a software implementation and support manager at Village Green, organized the event.

Eluskie said Village Green employees were working on blankets to donate to the dogs at each of the organizations.

“The whole thing behind it is that they’re trying to have people bring their dogs into the workplace, and other coworkers can see the great relationships you have with them, and you’re trying to promote adoption from rescues and shelters, showing that these rescue dogs can make great companions and what great dogs they can be,” Eluskie said.

Typically, Take Your Dog to Work Day is held inside the workplace, but due to building restrictions, the event was moved outside, Eluskie said.

Each participating dog got a goodie bag, and they enjoyed games, a costume contest and an awards ceremony.

Eluskie said she fosters 13-year-old dog Rosie through the Animal Placement Bureau. Rosie’s owner has dementia, Eluskie said, and Rosie has cancer.

She said she fosters dogs in memory of her first foster dog, Chloe, in 2002.

“There was a litter of pit bull puppies, her momma was a stray pit bull that was found on the streets, so they took her in and she had 11 puppies, and I wanted to get a companion for my dog Jake, so I decided to foster, because what if he didn’t want another dog?” Eluskie said. “So I found this organization, the Animal Placement Bureau, and I’ve been fostering for them since.”

Jenny Schneider, a property accountant at Village Green, got to spend the day with her dog, Roo — not related to the Live Like Roo namesake — 3, at the event.

“He and his siblings were found in a barn, and his sister got her ear bitten off by a horse or a goat or something,” Schneider said. “The foster mom was holding (Roo), and I was actually inquiring about his sister and she said, ‘Oh, she’s actually already taken, but we have this little guy.’”

Schneider said she was originally hoping for a female dog, but she gave Roo a chance during a meet and greet.

“It was the cutest thing. He was so tiny, but he was already running because he is a border collie and sheltie, so he’s very energetic,” she said. “We got along really well.”

Once it was time to sign over the paperwork, Schneider said she knew Roo was the pup for her.

“So I go inside and he actually followed me in, so I was like, ‘Can I just take him now?’”

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