Christina Krysiak’s mural design features three different portraits of women with their eyes covered in some fashion, which the teen artist described as a theme of what someone sees on the outside not being as important as one might think.

Christina Krysiak’s mural design features three different portraits of women with their eyes covered in some fashion, which the teen artist described as a theme of what someone sees on the outside not being as important as one might think.

Art provided by Mark Loeb


Teen artist creates design for newest Ferndale mural installation

By: Mike Koury | Woodward Talk | Published August 8, 2018

 Ferndale resident Christina Krysiak, 17, stands in front of the wall at the Cupcake Station on Nine Mile Road in Ferndale, where her mural will be installed in September during the DIY Street Fair and Funky Ferndale Art Fair. She is holding her mural design.

Ferndale resident Christina Krysiak, 17, stands in front of the wall at the Cupcake Station on Nine Mile Road in Ferndale, where her mural will be installed in September during the DIY Street Fair and Funky Ferndale Art Fair. She is holding her mural design.

Photo by Donna Agusti

FERNDALE — The Ferndale Arts and Cultural Commission has selected a new mural design that will be painted on the wall of the Cupcake Station on Nine Mile Road.

The mural, designed by Christina Krysiak, was chosen as the third mural to go up on the wall of the bakery, located at the corner of Allen and Nine Mile roads, during the DIY Street Fair and Funky Ferndale Art Fair Sept. 21-23. The design will be painted live at the fairs by Krysiak, professional artist Natalie Balazovich and the general public.

Krysiak, a student at the Center for Advanced Studies and the Arts and Berkley High School, was the winner of the Arts and Cultural Commission’s Inclusivity Mural competition, which has led to the installation of two other murals on the Cupcake Station designed by local students.

Her winning design features three unique portraits of women, each with their eyes closed or covered in some fashion.

“I knew that I wanted all of their eyes, in different ways, to be blocked out,” she said. “I kind of just chose relative themes for each one and went from there.”

The 17-year-old said the reason she wanted to block out all of the eyes fell in line with the mural contest theme of inclusivity.

“I wanted to represent that what you see on the outside isn’t necessarily like the truth or what is most important,” she said. “Inclusivity means that … you don’t have to look or act a certain way in order to be … accepted.

“Not having to worry about how you look to fit in, I think that’s important for young people especially to grasp these days,” she said.

Commission member Mark Loeb said Krysiak’s design represented what the board was looking for in a mural, in that it was creative, inclusive and also something the public could help paint.

“It’s very, very colorful. Very surprising,” he said. “Most people use more realistic images of people. Hers are just very stylized and dramatic, and we thought it would show off really well large.”

After this year’s mural goes up, there will only be space for one more on the Cupcake Station, said Loeb, while also stating that the commission is debating what else to include.

“There’s a center section that’s a little bit too small for another mural, so we were thinking (about)some poetry as part of next year’s (contest),” he said.

Loeb also speculated that, with the mixed-use parking structure “The dot” being built, they might look at if there’s an opportunity to design murals for its walls.

Entering her senior year of high school, Krysiak plans on entering the creative arts field after graduation, whether it be in an art or culinary school.

Krysiak said she’s excited to be able to paint her design with the rest of the public during the fair, and she thinks that it will be cool to look back on the experience every time she sees her contest-winning mural.

“Honestly, I never saw myself doing anything like this. It was just a really big surprise. Every time I think about it, it’s crazy,” she said.

“I’ve only entered a handful of contests. This is kind of my first exposure to this. I just never saw myself doing a project like this. It’s a really cool experience and exposure for myself, and I think it’s kind of shown how much I’ve grown this year. It’s just really crazy, and I can only imagine what’s to come,” she said.