The upcoming Sterling Heights Community Center is under construction in this photo, which was taken earlier this summer. City officials now expect the building to be ready for public use in February.

The upcoming Sterling Heights Community Center is under construction in this photo, which was taken earlier this summer. City officials now expect the building to be ready for public use in February.

File photo by Erin Sanchez


Sterling Heights delays community center opening to February

By: Eric Czarnik | Sterling Heights Sentry | Published August 9, 2019

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STERLING HEIGHTS — Residents who look forward to relaxing and playing at the new Sterling Heights Community Center will have to wait a bit longer, according to park officials.

During the Aug. 6 Sterling Heights City Council meeting, Parks and Recreation Director Kyle Langlois gave a progress report on the Recreating Recreation initiative, which has funded park improvements and amenities since voters narrowly approved a millage in 2016.

Langlois compared the latest developments to racing toward a finish line as city officials and work crews try to wrap up projects within a three-year time period.

He said the past 2 1/2 years have seen the introduction of the skate park, the reconstruction of Dodge Park, new pickleball courts at College Park and more.

However, he said residents will likely have to wait a bit longer to use the two-story community center that is still under construction. Originally, city officials had hoped to get the community center finished and open by the end of the year.

“Unfortunately, the extreme cold this past winter and the historic rainfalls of May and June have pushed back our originally scheduled opening date of December 2019,” Langlois said.

“We are going to continue to try to make up ground along the way so we can open up our doors in February of 2020. Assuming weather cooperates the rest of the way, our goal is to host the 2020 Cultural Exchange at the new center.”

Langlois said interior framing, underground utilities, stairwells and gymnasium concrete are currently being worked on.

“Our crews are working six days a week right now to try and complete this building as quickly as possible,” he said.

As for the parks themselves, several have seen upgrades to their bathrooms and pavilions, he said. One example is a recently completed bathroom renovation at Nelson Park, which included new toilets, stall partitions and a hand dryer.

Langlois said other park site amenities will include permanent pavilion picnic tables that should be delivered and installed by mid-September.

Delia Park is also home to a number of improvements, including a dog park that’s underway. The main dog park area will be around 1.25 acres, while a spot for smaller dogs will be around 0.75 acre, he said.

Langlois said the dog park setup will preserve around two dozen trees.

“Not only does it create some shady areas, but also provides some aesthetic quality and some natural beauty to this area as well,” he said.

Work is also imminent for creating the hike-and-bike nature trail that will connect Delia Park and the campus of Beaumont Hospital, Troy. Langlois said final permits are being resolved, and officials expect that project to be done by November.

“Our chosen contractor, LaSalle, will be beginning to mobilize in just a couple weeks,” he said.

Langlois added that the following parks still will get improvements by the time Recreating Recreation is over: Carpathia, Clinton River North, Farmstead, Magnolia, Mark Sawyers Family, Moravian, Nelson and Rotary.

City Manager Mark Vanderpool praised Langlois’ leadership and the “remarkable job” his team has done.

“We can’t wait to have the 2020 Cultural Exchange program in the new community center just across the street,” he said. “It’s going to be really awesome.”

Find out more about the Sterling Heights Parks and Recreation Department by visiting www.myshpr.net or by calling (586) 446-2700.

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