Attention Readers: We're Back
C&G Newspapers is pleased to have resumed publication. For the time being, our papers will publish on a biweekly basis as we work toward our return to weekly papers. In between issues, and anytime, continue to find local news on our website and look for us on Facebook and Twitter.
 Protesters kneel June 14 along Evergreen Road during the Kneel to Heal event. Participants knelt with their fists in the air for eight minutes and 42 seconds to honor the life of George Floyd, a man killed by police last month.

Protesters kneel June 14 along Evergreen Road during the Kneel to Heal event. Participants knelt with their fists in the air for eight minutes and 42 seconds to honor the life of George Floyd, a man killed by police last month.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Southfielders show up in droves for solidarity event

By: Kayla Dimick | Southfield Sun | Published June 23, 2020

 Demonstrators lined Evergreen Road.

Demonstrators lined Evergreen Road.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

SOUTHFIELD — The silence along Evergreen Road June 14 was deafening.

Hundreds gathered at 2 p.m. at the SFLD letters outside Southfield City Hall for Southfield Unity Day — Kneel to Heal.

Attendees — who were requested to wear face masks and to social distance — formed a human chain between 10 Mile and 11 Mile roads. The event was an act of solidarity amidst a call for the end of police brutality, specifically against black people and people of color, organized by the city and Urban Unity CDC, a foster care advocacy organization.

At 3:15 p.m., participants were asked to kneel for eight minutes and 42 seconds to honor the life of George Floyd.

The death of Floyd — a black resident in Minneapolis who died after a white police officer, Derek Chauvin, pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck — sparked a wave of demonstrations calling for the end of systemic racism and more diligent oversight of how law enforcement utilizes force.

“We’re making a statement that systemic racism and the excessive use of force in Southfield is not tolerable,” Southfield Mayor Ken Siver said over a megaphone at the event.

Demonstrators gathered along Evergreen Road, clad in personal protective equipment and holding signs. As cars drove by, many car horns blared, and cheers resonated from the crowd. But, at 3:15, all fell silent as the group remembered Floyd as they knelt with their fists in the air.

Farmington resident Kacey Craig said she decided to attend the event to take action against recent injustices.

“I think it’s important for the community to come together and really acknowledge that change needs to happen and to work for that change,” Craig said.

Chauvin was originally charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, but his charges were changed June 3 to second-degree murder.

The officers who helped restrain Floyd — Thomas Lane and J. Alexander Kueng, and Tou Thao, who stood near the others — were not initially charged. On June 3, all three men were charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder, and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

Southfield Police Chief Elvin Barren said he recently enacted a new policy called “duty to intervene.”

Barren said in a previous report that it is the duty of every sworn employee of the Southfield Police Department at every scene where physical force is being applied to either stop or attempt to stop another sworn employee when force is being inappropriately applied or is no longer required.

At the event, Barren said he was excited to see a large turnout and that it was important for the community to unite together on the issue.

“I’ve been very vocal about the death of Mr. George Floyd, and also very vocal about the fact that there has been decades and decades of misconduct and racism in police. So I’m glad to see we’re here united to make change. It does not stop here. These initiatives must continue. Right now, the world is watching.”

Lathrup Village Mayor Kelly Garrett also attended the event.

“I think this shows not only the unity that’s between the city of Southfield but the city of Lathrup Village and all the different community groups and churches,” Garrett said. “I think this is what it means to protest peacefully and in unity.”

Southfield Fire Chief Johnny Menifee, members of the Southfield City Council, state Sen. Jeremy Moss and Congresswoman Brenda Lawrence were also in attendance.

“I believe we were chosen for this time,” Lawrence said. “Nothing has changed without protest. Nothing has been transformational without us standing up and using our rights.”