The site of the former Eagle Elementary School in West Bloomfield Township is now destined to become a condominium complex that officials say will be in line with the community’s density goals.

The site of the former Eagle Elementary School in West Bloomfield Township is now destined to become a condominium complex that officials say will be in line with the community’s density goals.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Site of former Eagle Elementary to be developed into condos

By: Andy Kozlowski | West Bloomfield Beacon | Published November 7, 2019

 The new development is intended to meet a “middle housing” need in West Bloomfield Township that strikes a balance between single-family residences and high-density residential areas.

The new development is intended to meet a “middle housing” need in West Bloomfield Township that strikes a balance between single-family residences and high-density residential areas.

Photo by Deb Jacques

Advertisement

WEST BLOOMFIELD — The West Bloomfield Township Board of Trustees recently approved zoning changes at the site of the former Eagle Elementary School that pave the way for the development of a 52-unit condominium complex, tentatively titled Gramercy Ridge.

The zoning changes took effect upon the site plan approval, which occurred at the Oct. 21 board meeting. The rezoning changes the site from an R-15 single-family home district to an R-M multiple-family residential district. The site is located at 29410 W. 14 Mile Road, at the northwest corner of Middlebelt and 14 Mile roads.

The property previously belonged to Farmington Public Schools, and it is currently under option by Hunter Pasteur Homes, with the deal expected to be completed by the end of the month. Hunter Pasteur Homes is also the builder-developer behind the upcoming Gramercy Ridge condominium complex.

Franklin Property Corp. is the general contractor and development consultant to Hunter Pasteur Homes. Andy Milia, the president of Franklin Property Corp., said that the project will feature ranch units ranging in size from 1,500 to 2,200 square feet, with the option for second-story units. The condos will feature high-end landscaping, stone patios, full basements and two-car attached garages, and they will be built with high-quality materials, including brick and stone.

The developer previously considered the site for a larger project, with a proposal submitted to the township’s Planning Commission in February for a complex featuring 54-68 attached single-family homes. At the time, this required the township board to lift a moratorium on increased density in single-family residential districts that was put in place last year but has since expired, in June.

“The scope of the project has been reduced to 52 homes to comply with the township’s density requirements,” explained Township Supervisor Steven Kaplan.

He said that the Gramercy Ridge project fulfills a housing need in the township, striking a balance between single-family residences and high-density residential areas. He also said it doesn’t add to the township’s oversaturation of senior living facilities — a concern previously raised by a township-commissioned land use study — and it does not violate the township’s goal of avoiding high-density apartment buildings.

The development agreement still needs to be approved, which Kaplan expects to take place on Nov. 18. The master deed also has to be recorded. In addition, the developer still has to secure engineering and building permits.

“The township is receptive to residential developments,” Kaplan said. “We are encouraging developers to build missing middle housing products, including townhomes, lofts, duplexes and quadplexes. The township is working to develop a housing master plan and to develop ways to implement these goals.”

Milia said that the process went relatively smoothly for the developer.

“The township has been excellent to work with, both the board and the Planning Commission, as well as the Building Department and Planning Department. The board encouraged us early on to meet with the neighborhood groups, which we always do, and we had three or four separate meetings with them to share concept plans prior to even formally submitting. So it was a very good collaborative effort with the neighborhood groups, the township board and Planning Commission, and as a result, we think we have a highly desirable plan that was approved unanimously by both the board and Planning Commission, with no neighborhood opposition, because we already had so much of their input early on,” Milia said.

He also noted that the developer is abiding by the township’s high environmental and building quality standards.

“It coincides with our own standards,” Milia said. “This has been a very good meeting of the minds for the community and what we saw for the site as a high-quality development.”

Advertisement