The city of Roseville is installing bike lanes, like one seen in this photograph from the Greenway Collaborative, throughout the community. City officials say the bike lanes will make the city safer for bicyclists and pedestrians, and ultimately will cut down on city expenses by reducing auto-related accidents.

The city of Roseville is installing bike lanes, like one seen in this photograph from the Greenway Collaborative, throughout the community. City officials say the bike lanes will make the city safer for bicyclists and pedestrians, and ultimately will cut down on city expenses by reducing auto-related accidents.

Photo provided by Norm Cox


Roseville encourages residents to take advantage of new bike lanes

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published October 30, 2018

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ROSEVILLE — The city of Roseville is embracing a trend and including bike lanes in its community.

Roseville recently completed a project to install bike lanes along Martin Road. The lanes are intended to get bikes off the sidewalks, away from pedestrians, in a manner that keeps the bicyclists safe in the road.

“It goes down Martin Road toward St. Clair Shores, all the way from Groesbeck and extends across Gratiot,” said Roseville Mayor Robert Taylor. “It’s supposed to connect our community with our neighbors like Eastpointe and St. Clair Shores.”

The Greenway Collaborative, a group that seeks to make communities more walkable and bikeable, recently completed a push to encourage residents to take advantage of such resources in their individual communities. Norm Cox, the president of the Greenway Collaborative, made a presentation to the Roseville City Council Oct. 23 to share with the public the advantages of having more bike lanes.

“Beyond the health issues, more walkable and bikeable communities promote people walking and biking, which helps chronic diseases, which there is a lot of in Roseville,” said Cox. “The bicycle and pedestrian crash rates (in Roseville) are twice the state average. Twelve people walking and three people biking over the last 10 years have been killed. That’s 43 percent of the fatal crashes in Roseville in that time frame. The social and economic costs of these crashes costs $2.7 million, or $68 per resident. Any money spent on biking and pedestrian safety measures will ultimately be a strong infrastructure investment. The most expensive course of action is doing nothing.”

Cox said the Greenway Collaborative is promoting these community resources through grant money from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The grant is completed as of the end of September, and it was a CDC grant that came through the (Michigan Department of Health and Human Services), and it was a four-year grant,” he said. “The Greater Detroit Area Health Council was the lead agency, which partnered with many local communities for this grant. As one of those partners, we were trying to improve walkability and bikeability in Roseville, Eastpointe and Center Line, and encourage physical activity.”

Cox also said he wants to better educate people on how the bike lanes work, as there often is confusion among residents when such lanes are installed.

“When a bike lane goes up in a community, there is some confusion from part of the community and people who don’t get how it works,” he added. “I wanted to inform the board they are doing the right thing and it’s benefiting the community, even if there are some complaints from community members.”

The city of Roseville paid for its new bike lanes through a separate grant from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

“We are paying through, I believe, all of this project through a grant,” Taylor said. “It is coming from the Michigan Department Health and Human Services and is for almost $400,000 to us, Warren, Eastpointe and Center Line. We’re trying to tie our project in with those being done by neighboring communities.”

The bike lanes are ready for public use and should eventually connect with similar lanes in nearby municipalities.

“The bike lanes are currently open in Roseville. I think there is some signage that still needs to be completed, but people can use the lanes now,” said Taylor. “They haven’t set a completion date for the entire project across the neighboring communities, but the hope is to connect Detroit all the way to Lake St. Clair.”

Cox said these new lanes will be a great improvement in quality of life for Roseville residents.

“Roseville investing in designated bike lanes would reduce injuries and fatalities, and everyone, regardless of mode of travel, should be able to do so safely,” said Cox. “Whether by choice or economic necessity, people shouldn’t have to take their life in their hands if they are biking to work.”

Taylor added that he hopes more bike lanes will be added in Roseville in the future.

“We don’t have plans as of now for additional bike lanes in Roseville, but I think once people see how much safer they make the city, there will be a push to include more bike lanes around our downtown area,” said Taylor. “It will be pretty evident how good this is for our community.”

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