Officer likely saved man’s life after injury caused heavy blood loss

By: Mike Koury | Woodward Talk | Published July 16, 2019

 Ferndale officer Zach Coyle put a tourniquet on a 29-year-old Royal Oak man’s leg that was bleeding heavily, which likely saved the man’s life, according to paramedics.

Ferndale officer Zach Coyle put a tourniquet on a 29-year-old Royal Oak man’s leg that was bleeding heavily, which likely saved the man’s life, according to paramedics.

Photo provided by the Ferndale Police Department

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FERNDALE — A local police officer potentially saved a man’s life after recognizing that the loss of blood from a leg injury was life-threatening.

At 12:30 a.m July 7, the Ferndale Police Department received a report of a broken window at Wetmore Tire and Auto in the 23000 block of Woodward Avenue.

Around the same time, Sgt. Baron Brown said, police got a report that a man had broken the window and was last seen walking southbound on Woodward, bleeding.

Officers were sent to both Wetmore and to look for the person who was bleeding. They located a 29-year-old Royal Oak man near Woodward and Pearson Street who had severe lacerations to his right leg that were bleeding heavily.

Officer Zach Coyle, using his military experience, recognized the seriousness of the leg injury.

“(Coyle) is a combat veteran from overseas, and he looked at the amount of bleeding, and his training made him feel like we needed to get a tourniquet applied to the man’s leg,” Brown said. “The officer put a tourniquet on his upper right leg to get the bleeding to stop. It was bleeding that badly.”

Medical personnel arrived on the scene to further treat the man, who was transferred to Royal Oak Beaumont Hospital. After evaluating the injury, Brown said they told police that the tourniquet likely saved the man’s life.

“He had lost so much blood — because he was going in and out of consciousness — that there was a risk to his life due to the loss of blood,” he said.

Brown said the Royal Oak man denied kicking the window, and said he got into an argument with his girlfriend and got out of the car to walk.

“As we were dealing with him, it appeared as though he was going in and out of consciousness,” he said.

Brown said the department gets yearly medical training that covers the basics. In this instance, Coyle had more extensive training.

“It doesn’t sound like ... there was an arterial bleed, which would be pumping up blood, but the fact that he lost so much blood clearly made (Coyle) feel like it was a life or death situation, and we couldn’t allow him to lose anymore blood,” he said.

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