Earlier this month, the communities of Southfield, Lathrup Village and Beverly Hills teamed up to reduce speeding on Southfield Road.

Earlier this month, the communities of Southfield, Lathrup Village and Beverly Hills teamed up to reduce speeding on Southfield Road.

File photo by Deb Jacques


Oakland County communities crack down on Southfield Road speeding

By: Kayla Dimick, Tiffany Esshaki | C&G Newspapers | Published December 27, 2019

METRO DETROIT — They see you when you’re speeding. They know when you’re unsafe.

Earlier this month, the communities of Southfield, Lathrup Village and Beverly Hills teamed up to reduce speeding on Southfield Road.

The three-month pilot project, called the Southfield Road Safety and Speed Enforcement Program, is set to run through March.

Police said the program covers a 5-mile stretch of the road, between Nine Mile and 14 Mile roads.

According to a joint press release from the communities, an estimated 40,000 vehicles travel along Southfield Road on a daily basis.

Southfield Police Chief Elvin Barren said Lathrup Village Police Chief Scott McKee reached out to the jurisdictions to get the ball rolling on the program.

“What we’re seeing is an uptick in traffic crashes, and it appears speed is a contributing factor in all of these crashes,” McKee said. “We are partnering with neighborhood communities to see if we can enforce the speed limit a little better, which will hopefully result in fewer crashes — especially during the holiday season.”

One of the reasons for speeding in the area, Barren said, is motorists transitioning from the freeway.

“When you look at the complaints coming in, the main issue that we see is speeding. Motorists need to adjust to the transition from freeway to roadway,” Barren said. “They’re still in their mindset of the freeway, and when you come onto Southfield Road, where the speed limit is 45 mph, people just want to drive 60 mph.”

Barren said motorists can expect marked and unmarked police cars along the road from all three agencies.

Officers will be monitoring speeds and distracted driving, as well as adherence to traffic control devices.

Beverly Hills Village Administrator Chris Wilson said speeding along that corridor is a concern for his residents because where Southfield Road enters the village, the neighborhood is largely residential.

“We want to make sure the speeds there are in keeping with a neighborhood,” said Wilson. “This will give us the chance to assess how much speeding is going on, what to do to calm traffic and make it safe for pedestrians.”