Normandy Park, located on Little Mack Avenue in Clinton Township, recently received a $46,500 grant for green infrastructure upgrades.

Normandy Park, located on Little Mack Avenue in Clinton Township, recently received a $46,500 grant for green infrastructure upgrades.

Photo by Nick Mordowanec


Normandy Park receives grant for green infrastructure projects

By: Nick Mordowanec | Fraser - Clinton Township Chronicle | Published August 20, 2019

 A bioretention area within the park will be improved, by way of plants and grading that should improve stormwater flow.

A bioretention area within the park will be improved, by way of plants and grading that should improve stormwater flow.

Photo by Nick Mordowanec

Advertisement

CLINTON TOWNSHIP — Normandy Park is getting what Clinton Township Supervisor Bob Cannon called “a shot in the arm” thanks to thousands of dollars in available grant funding.

On July 29, the Board of Trustees unanimously approved a motion to receive a total of $46,500 from the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, or SEMCOG, as part of its Green Infrastructure Implementation program.

Funds come from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative as a means of developing southeast Michigan’s green economy. The program’s goal involves providing funding to public entities and schools for the construction of green infrastructure techniques for the benefit of the environment, such as stormwater runoff and nutrient-loading reduction.

The Board of Trustees unanimously approved a resolution seeking such funds this past March, with the goals of the township consistent with the parameters of the grant’s intention. Scott Chabot, senior project engineer for township engineering firm Anderson, Eckstein and Westrick, said the grant was submitted March 29 and was awarded in early July.

As it pertains to Normandy Park, which is located at 34300 Little Mack Ave., Chabot said residents will notice parking lot and trail improvements.

“The grant money will need to be used for the green infrastructure work, such as (the) purchase and installation of the needed plants and grading work to create the bioretention area,” Chabot said.

The bioretention area will be a butterfly and pollinator garden, while the plantings will be “stormwater friendly.”

Chabot added that this is another opportunity for the township “to expand the practices of urban ecology within the community,” offering “intrinsic environmental benefits.”

“Urban ecology is using sustainable green technologies that can work harmoniously in urban and suburban environments,” he said.

Cannon added that the township gets its “money’s worth” in its partnership with SEMCOG, referring to past grant money.

In the summer of 2018, the township received $1.3 million toward a shared-use path and bridge over the Clinton River. It was one of about two dozen projects that SEMCOG helped award to local communities, totaling about $13 million overall.

“We’re very happy to be getting this grant. … SEMCOG has been good to us recently,” Cannon said.

Work at Normandy Park is planned to begin in the spring of next year because of project needs that require paving and plantings. Work executed as part of the grant must be completed by the end of 2020.

Advertisement