New renovation plans for the Niles-Barnard House call for new windows, rather than restoring the historical windows seen here.

New renovation plans for the Niles-Barnard House call for new windows, rather than restoring the historical windows seen here.

File photo by Deb Jacques


Niles-Barnard House restoration proceeds

By: Terry Oparka | Troy Times | Published December 18, 2019

 The new scope of work on the Niles-Barnard House at the Troy Historic Village includes refurbishing existing walls and floors.

The new scope of work on the Niles-Barnard House at the Troy Historic Village includes refurbishing existing walls and floors.

Photos provided by the Troy Historic Village

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TROY — Plans for the first phase of the restoration of the Niles-Barnard House will start after the Troy City Council approved a $618,675 contract, which is within the $700,000 set aside for the project in the city budget.

The council unanimously awarded the contract to Cedroni Associates at a Nov. 25 meeting.

“We’re very pleased we have a contract, that the restoration will go forward, and pleased the city indicated it is phase one,”  said Loraine Campbell, the executive director of the Troy Historic Village.

The City Council, by consensus at an April 15 budget study session, slated $700,000 in the 2019-20 city budget for restorations at the historical home.

The Niles-Barnard House was donated to the city in 2005 and was moved to the grounds of the Troy Historic Village in 2010 — where it has since remained shuttered.

The city of Troy owns the land and the structures at the Troy Historic Village. The city maintains the buildings and grounds, and the Troy Historical Society runs and operates the village.

The Troy Historical Society funded the $874,142 cost for land acquisition, moving the home and the initial stabilization.

The city defunded the village in 2009 during the economic downturn. In 2007-08, the operating budget for the village, funded by the city, was $500,000. That shrank to $270,000 in 2008-09.

The original scope of the restorations included the removal and replacement of wall finishes; the widening of interior doorways; the renovation of restrooms to be accessible to those with disabilities; the installation of new kitchen cabinets and appliances for food preparation; making the entrance accessible to those with disabilities; the installation of two new staircases; new plumbing, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems; and new wiring and outlets.

The bid for that scope of work was $1.2 million.

The new scope of work includes an entrance accessible to those with disabilities, two new restrooms, refurbished existing walls and floors on the first floor, updates to the electrical system and closing off the second floor. The plans now call for new windows, rather than restoring the historical windows.

“We exhausted all options to keep the windows,” said Public Works Director Kurt Bovensiep.

The Troy Historic District Commission approved the conceptual design Sept. 16.

Bovensiep told the council that the planned renovations are expected to be finished by June 30, 2020.

“It’s a great asset for our community,” said Mayor Pro Tem David Hamilton.

Councilwoman Edna Abrahim noted that part of the city’s agreement with the Historical Society when the house was moved was that the city was contractually required to maintain the building. She added that the renovated space will be used for events and as a revenue generator.

“There is return on investment,” she said.

For more information on the Troy Historic Village, visit troyhistoricvillage.org or call (248) 524-3570.

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