Recreational Authority of Roseville and Eastpointe volunteer Kelita McCall demonstrates the pullup station at the new fitness court located inside Huron Park in Roseville.

Recreational Authority of Roseville and Eastpointe volunteer Kelita McCall demonstrates the pullup station at the new fitness court located inside Huron Park in Roseville.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


New fitness court unveiled at Huron park

By: Brendan Losinski | Roseville - Eastpointe Eastsider | Published October 11, 2019

 The National Fitness Campaign worked with the Recreational Authority of Roseville and Eastpointe to install a fitness court in Roseville’s Huron park that is open to the public year-round.

The National Fitness Campaign worked with the Recreational Authority of Roseville and Eastpointe to install a fitness court in Roseville’s Huron park that is open to the public year-round.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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ROSEVILLE — The Recreational Authority of Roseville and Eastpointe unveiled its new fitness court at Huron park in Roseville Oct. 9.

A ribbon-cutting for the new equipment was held, and both RARE and city officials showed off the capabilities of the new fitness court.

“It’s a full-body, seven-minute workout that can be completed alone or in a group,” explained Sarah Frederick, the assistant director of RARE. “There’s ab exercises, core exercises, squats, pullups, pushups, lunges, agility stations and there is an app you can download that walks you through the steps and stations. It’s called ‘Fitness Court.’”

The fitness court stems from a program by the National Fitness Campaign to encourage exercise and healthy living.

“There was an initiative started by the National Fitness Campaign that was offering fitness courts to a handful of communities across the country,” said Roseville City Manager Scott Adkins. “Their initial starting group was 100 cities. They reached out to Roseville and the recreation authority and asked us if we wanted to be involved, and we said, ‘Absolutely.’”

Huron Park, located at the intersection of Kelly and Frazho roads, is only one of three Michigan locations included in the initial group of 100 selected by the National Fitness Campaign to receive a fitness court. It was chosen as the site due to its existing amenities and its location being convenient for both Roseville and Eastpointe residents.

“The NFC reached out to us; we responded. It was a competitive process, but we were able to land the initial grant for this,” said Adkins. “We looked at parks in both Eastpointe and Roseville, and it was decided Huron Park was the best because of resources here, like the walking path and the skate park, and because it’s centrally located between the two towns.”

The fitness court can be used at any time the park is open; Huron Park closes at dark. The court is designed to be used without supervision, but RARE officials said they will be offering group classes that will utilize the fitness court in the near future.

“We are looking to start monthly instructional classes,” Frederick said. “We want to make people comfortable so they know how to properly use the equipment. Some people might be nervous or intimidated to come here and try it on their own, so they might like it more if there were an instructor.”

Information on upcoming classes can be found on RARE’s website, rare-mi.org.

Very little of the fitness court was paid for out of RARE’s general budget, as the initial grant from the National Fitness Campaign was supplemented by both federal Community Development Block Grants and donations from local residents.

“We got some seed money by way of a grant. We used some funds from individual donations and block grant money to put another asset into the community for use by residents in both cities,” said Adkins. “It’s a great opportunity to get out and get fit and get a little workout in. It’s all-season. A lot of people were questioning the outdoor aspect, but not every day is going to be snowy in the winter here, and there’s a number of activities people of all different abilities and ages can do, and we hope to have a lot of folks using this.”

Outdoor equipment has a tendency to take wear and tear more quickly, but RARE Director Tony Lipinski said the equipment is designed to withstand both the elements and the public.

“There’s a concern about upkeep, but we will keep an eye on maintaining it and we hope the residents using it will help out,” he said. “It is built for the outdoors and to survive in the wintertime.”

Frederick advised that residents be careful and take appropriate care when using the new equipment, but she wants to assure residents that park attendants will be on hand at Huron Park in case of emergencies.

“I’m sure there are safety precautions people need to take when using the equipment, but we do have park attendants at the parks, so if there is an emergency, they can step in,” she said.

“We really want people to know that fitness can be free for anyone and available at any time,”  Frederick continued. “This is an outdoor fitness court, so you don’t need a gym membership, you don’t need to pay a monthly fee, you can just be walking here with your family and stop and get a good workout in.”

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