MDOT held a public meeting Feb. 3 to discuss a project planned for M-59 in the townships of Chesterfield, Clinton, Harrison and Macomb. MDOT is set to rebuild 4.5 miles of the highway in the area in two phases over two years. Pictured is eastbound M-59 in Clinton Township.

MDOT held a public meeting Feb. 3 to discuss a project planned for M-59 in the townships of Chesterfield, Clinton, Harrison and Macomb. MDOT is set to rebuild 4.5 miles of the highway in the area in two phases over two years. Pictured is eastbound M-59 in Clinton Township.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


MDOT meeting details M-59 reconstruction project

By: Alex Szwarc | C&G Newspapers | Published February 4, 2021

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CLINTON TOWNSHIP/MACOMB TOWNSHIP/HARRISON TOWNSHIP — Over four miles of M-59 in eastern Macomb County are set to be reconstructed.

On Feb. 3, the Michigan Department of Transportation, or MDOT, held a virtual public meeting to discuss a reconstruction project planned for the highway in the townships of Chesterfield, Clinton, Harrison and Macomb.

M-59 in Macomb County, also known as Hall Road, is maintained by MDOT.

MDOT is set to rebuild 4.5 miles of M-59 in the townships in two phases over two years, from Romeo Plank Road to Interstate 94.

The reconstruction project is set to begin this year at an estimated cost of $63 million. It does not call for widening of Hall Road.

The meeting was open to MDOT representatives, residents, business owners and community leaders.

“The project includes replacement of the asphalt roadway, water main and storm sewer work, sign replacement, signal modernization, and work to fill in sidewalk gaps, along with ramp and sidewalks that are compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act,” a press release states.

Phase one is M-59 from Romeo Plank Road to just east of Elizabeth Road. That portion is slated this year from March to November. The second phase runs from east of Elizabeth Road to east of I-94, scheduled from March 2022 to November 2022.

During construction, MDOT construction engineer Tia Klein said two lanes will be open daily to traffic on both sides of M-59 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. At night, traffic may be reduced to one lane.  

She said that, for both phases, there will be two steps for maintaining traffic. The first is traffic maintained on the outside of each direction for median work. For the second step, traffic will be directed to the median lanes, and construction on outside lanes will happen.

Klein added there will be a 14-day full closure of each side of M-59 for work on the railroad crossings between Groesbeck Highway and Gratiot Avenue this fall.

M-59 through traffic will be detoured, and temporary median crossovers will be installed to maintain access to businesses.  

Spiro Kotsonis, MDOT project manager of design, said design work began over a year ago, with it being added to the state’s Rebuilding Michigan Initiative last February.

“M-59 has the most highly dense commercial corridor in the state, which is one of the reasons this was selected,“ he said.

Kotsonis noted that pavement along M-59 has many locations that are failing.

“We’ve tried various forms of maintenance like concrete patching to keep up with the potholes but decided a long-term fix is needed,” Kotsonis said.

Geometric improvements are planned at the intersection of Groesbeck Highway and M-59.

Kotsonis said that, on northbound Groesbeck, there is a dedicated right turn lane and shared through right turn lane at the intersection.

“After the project is completed, the intersection will have an additional dedicated right turn lane to improve capacity,” he said.  

Jim Petronski, MDOT assistant construction engineer and ombudsman, said they want to encourage as much traffic as possible to businesses along M-59 in the area.

“Not just for the commercial aspect, but we understand that people work at these businesses and there are a number of manufacturing businesses within the corridor,” he said.  

To learn more about the project, visit movingmacomb.org.

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