Delta Airlines pilot First Officer Chad Born hands a stuffed dog to Gavin Doss, 3, of Macomb Township, Dec. 13 at Beaumont’s annual holiday party for pediatric patients at the Beaumont Service Center in Southfield. Brother Jackson Doss, 6, also chose a dog.

Delta Airlines pilot First Officer Chad Born hands a stuffed dog to Gavin Doss, 3, of Macomb Township, Dec. 13 at Beaumont’s annual holiday party for pediatric patients at the Beaumont Service Center in Southfield. Brother Jackson Doss, 6, also chose a dog.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Hospital makes spirits bright through annual holiday party

By: Kayla Dimick | Southfield Sun | Published December 18, 2018

 Daniel Goodman, 5, of Madison Heights, chats with Santa.

Daniel Goodman, 5, of Madison Heights, chats with Santa.

Photo by Patricia O'Blenes

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SOUTHFIELD — Pediatric patients got a dose of holiday cheer Dec. 13 during the Beaumont Center for Children’s Rehabilitation’s annual holiday party.

Around 300 guests — patients of Beaumont’s physical therapy and occupational therapy programs and their families — gathered at the Beaumont Service Center in Southfield for the soiree.

Lillian Swann, of Clinton Township, attended the party with her 7-year-old daughter, Chloe. It was their first year at the event.

Swann said Chloe, along with her 9-year-old brother, Alexander, both have cerebral palsy. They have been utilizing Beaumont’s services to help with stability, endurance, balance and speech.

“This is a great event because we only see families in and out of the services, so it’s really nice to be able to connect to people,” Swann said. “It’s also a good way to know your therapist, too, and get to know your therapist on a different level.”

According to officials, the party is put together with the help of Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, Delta Airlines and Fairytale Productions.

Partygoers enjoyed a meal of pizza before they had the chance to meet Delta Airlines pilots as they passed out gifts to each child. They also enjoyed games, crafts, a photo booth and visits with the Delta Airlines mascot, Baldy the Eagle, and none other than Santa himself.

Debbie Adsit, the supervisor of pediatric rehabilitation at the Beaumont Center for Children’s Rehabilitation, said patients from all of the Beaumont clinics were invited to the party.

“It’s an opportunity for the families to come and celebrate the holidays in an environment that’s safe and comfortable for them because of their child’s special needs,” Adsit said.

Organizers came up with a unique way for the children to visit with Santa, Adsit said.

“Any child has a hard time waiting in line for Santa, so every child gets a number and then we call numbers at a certain time, so you wait for three people,” she said. “We also keep him off to this side so that it’s just a general holiday celebration and not specific to Christmas.”

Adsit said the party has been held at a variety of locations, but this is the first time it’s been held in Southfield.

“We have so much more space here. This one has allowed for much greater flow, where we used to be more tight. There’s so much more space for the families to move around, and in addition, we have seperate rooms for kids who might find it overwhelming; they can go in a quiet room to eat their dinner,” Adsit said.

Adsit said the Delta pilots have been involved in the event for 16 years.

“They bring just a massive amount of presents for the kids,” she said. “(The event) started out like that — just the kids and the presents — but we’ve grown as a system and just grown in what we’ve been able to do.”

Delta pilot Jim Young said he has been participating in the program for 25 years through the Pilots for Kids program, which is a group of aviation professionals who aim to serve hospitalized children.

“During the holiday season, kids who are in the hospital have other things on their minds. This organization gives me the opportunity to not only satisfy me and make me feel warm inside (by) putting smiles on their face, but to take their mind off what’s going on in their minds,” Young said. “That’s what this season is all about.”

Young said he enjoys participating in the Beaumont event because he often gets to see kids get better.

“We get to see kids one year in a wheelchair, one year in a walker, one year with crutches as they progress year to year to year. It’s really satisfying,” he said. “It’s a neat thing. It really is.”

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