“I think what I’ve heard and the assets I can bring will be best served representing the entire city,” Warren City Council at-large candidate Patrick Green said at Warren’s Veterans Memorial Park, where a bench honors his father, James Green, a World War II veteran.

“I think what I’ve heard and the assets I can bring will be best served representing the entire city,” Warren City Council at-large candidate Patrick Green said at Warren’s Veterans Memorial Park, where a bench honors his father, James Green, a World War II veteran.

Photo by Brian Louwers


Green: ‘If you give me a task, I will take it to the end’

By: Brian Louwers | Warren Weekly | Published October 9, 2019

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WARREN — Patrick Green spent seven years on Warren’s Zoning Board of Appeals before he was elected to the City Council in 2007. He served two four-year terms on the council and was elected to a third in 2015 before he left the following year to serve in the Michigan House of Representatives.

An insurance agent by day and a lifetime Warren resident, he said his two-year stint as a legislator in Lansing opened his eyes to the challenges facing municipalities.

“I was the highest-ranking Democrat working with local governments across the state,” Green said. “That was a great, great experience, traveling across the state, seeing cities, villages and townships and what they do to make the experience of their residents the best.

“I’m running to bring all those assets that I learned — from the Lower Peninsula to the Upper Peninsula, and again, the villages and townships — and bring those back and work with everyone to create the best Warren for everyone. I don’t think we do enough right now. I think we do some things well, but I think there’s a lot of things we can do better,” Green said.

He cited the rollout of the city’s new sanitation bin program as something residents say they’re pleased with when he’s out knocking on doors during the campaign. Green said he’d like to learn more about the rumored plans for the city’s Downtown Development Authority district; he said that some residents are interested in that too.

But what they really care about, he said, are solid city services, things like police patrols and fire protection, trash collection and street repairs.

Of course, that all costs money, and Warren’s $278 million budget will be in the hands of a new-look City Council come November. Green said there’s only one way to ensure the people’s business gets attended to, and he wants to use his experience at the city and state levels to facilitate that by working with new council members.

“Council speaks their policy through the implementation of the budget, and the mayor and the administration executes it,” Green said. “We’re not just talking about numbers. We’re talking about policy.”

While he’s running at-large to represent the city as a whole, Green said he’d like to see more activity on projects happening in individual districts. He’d like to see all council members hold office hours to seek input from constituents in an effort to better guide the policy of the council as a whole.

“I think what I’ve heard and the assets I can bring will be best served representing the entire city,” Green said. “How can I help? That’s my job. When you have a problem, how can I help? I will do everything in my power to achieve that goal. If you give me a task, I will take it to the end.”

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