The Franklin Historical Society will offer a tour of several of the village’s historical sites and will share strange and unusual tales from  the community’s history, including places such as  the site of the former  Congleton Buggy Works.

The Franklin Historical Society will offer a tour of several of the village’s historical sites and will share strange and unusual tales from the community’s history, including places such as the site of the former Congleton Buggy Works.

Photo provided by Ann Lamott


Franklin Historical Society walking tour offers a glimpse at village’s untold stories

By: Brendan Losinski | Birmingham - Bloomfield Eagle | Published May 21, 2018

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FRANKLIN — The Franklin Historical Society will be showing off some of the village’s most interesting sites and telling some of its most unusual stories in a new walking tour.

The tour is the creation of Ann Lamott, the president of the Historical Society. She did the research necessary to create the program and will be leading the tour herself as a guide.

“I’ve done several walking tours of Franklin before, but this is the first one of this kind,” explained Lamott. “I’ve done a Civil War walking tour in a previous year and one about how Franklin began, for instance. … It’s an hour to an hour and a half at an easy pace. It will be less than a mile.”

The tour will commence at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 2, at the intersection of 14 Mile Road and Franklin Road, and it will end at the Kreger Barn, on the Franklin Village Green. Refreshments will be offered at the walk’s conclusion.

“We will start at Franklin and 14 Mile Road and go south, because that’s how the village started,” Lamott said. “People are always asking, ‘What happened here?’ or, ‘What happened there?’ so I‘ve been trying to find some fun stuff at various locations throughout the village.”

The cost for the tour is $10 per person. No registration is required, and payments may be made at the start of the tour.

Lamott said her goal was to find some of the unusual stories and unsolved mysteries from Franklin’s past — tales of love, crime and mischief involving residents living there as far back as the early 1800s.

“Franklin Road has buildings almost 200 years old, and some are very well-preserved,” she said. “Everyday people have lived there; businesses have been there. There was a mysterious elopement at one home, there was a woman accused of assault and battery at another site, so we will explore a lot of incidents like that.”

Lamott said she decided to host the walking tour out of her love for the community.

“I just looked at what’s there,” she continued. “I’ve lived in Franklin for 20 years, and I’ve always had an interest in history and how people are connected to their ancestors and past events and seeing how people affected the community in the past and present.”

Eileen Pulker, the Franklin village clerk, has been on several of the previous Historical Society tours and spoke highly of how they show off the village and its history.

“When you go on a tour with Ann Lamott, she has historical data on the buildings here and information on the residents, on the people who used to live here. ... She does a lot of research and she always finds such interesting details.”

Pulker said that anyone with a love for Franklin or an interest in history will enjoy themselves.

“It’s not a long walk, but you do need to wear walking shoes and enjoy the day,” said Pulker. “I find it all very interesting. It’s so fun to find out about former residents of the village. All the stories are very fun and engaging. … (Lamott) did one on all the barns we have around downtown, and that one I found particularly interesting.”

Lamott said she thinks Franklin residents with long ties to the village will particularly find a lot to learn on the tour, as well as perhaps a few connections to the village’s history.

“I think history gives us a personal identity. We see how the settlers shaped our local government, our schools or our downtown,” remarked Lamott. “It also lets you connect with your past. We get people who have ancestors featured on the tour or who have streets named after members of their family.”

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