Former Chippewa Valley Schools Assistant Superintendent of Educational Services Ed Skiba, left, died July 10 at the age of 67. Skiba began his 44-year education career as a music teacher with Chippewa Valley Schools. He retired in June 2019. ​​​​​​​

Former Chippewa Valley Schools Assistant Superintendent of Educational Services Ed Skiba, left, died July 10 at the age of 67. Skiba began his 44-year education career as a music teacher with Chippewa Valley Schools. He retired in June 2019. ​​​​​​​

File photo


Former Chippewa Valley administrator dies

By: Alex Szwarc | C&G Newspapers | Published July 20, 2020

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MACOMB TOWNSHIP/CLINTON TOWNSHIP — Former longtime education leader Ed Skiba, of Macomb Township, died July 10 at the age of 67.

Skiba’s obituary indicates he leaves behind his wife, two children, three grandchildren and three sisters.

Skiba began his 44-year education career with Chippewa Valley Schools as a music teacher, later forming and becoming director of the alumni choir at Chippewa Valley High School, due to his passion for keeping in touch with his former students.

In June 2019, he retired as the assistant superintendent of educational services for the district.

At that time, Skiba said the district had always been a family to him, adding that every teacher cared about everyone else.

“We worked hard and we played hard together,” he said. “Any time someone was hired in, we made sure we welcomed them and made them feel part of the fold. It was like being in another family.”

Skiba, whose wife owns Mary Skiba’s School of Dance in Clinton Township, served Chippewa Valley Schools for 29 years. First as a teacher, then an assistant principal prior to joining the administrative staff as the executive director of secondary education.

He began teaching in 1976 at Warren Fitzgerald High School.

After his time at Fitzgerald, Skiba taught at Woodhaven, Warren Consolidated Schools and Warren Woods Tower.

He was a teacher for 11 years, six of which were at Chippewa Valley High School in the 1980s.

He later served as the assistant principal at CVHS from 1987 to 1995. From 1995 to 2004, he worked as an assistant principal of Lincoln Middle School, part of Van Dyke Public Schools. He returned to Chippewa Valley Schools in 2004 as assistant superintendent of educational services.

Regardless of what position he was in, Skiba said he always learned from those around him.

“Some of the biggest problems I had to solve, I figured out from kids who gave me the answer,” he said. “I learned the effect poverty and trauma has on learning.”

Don Brosky, who replaced Skiba as the district’s assistant superintendent of educational services after his retirement, said he regularly spoke with Skiba.

Brosky has known Skiba for the last decade, working closely with him since 2014 in the education services department.

“He was a mentor of mine,” he said. “He took me under his wing and had a lot of connections within the district.”

Brosky called Skiba a renaissance man who was always student-centered and had a big personality.

“He was a guy who loved life and took advantage of every opportunity,” he said.

Brosky added that Skiba was an encyclopedia of baseball knowledge and would schedule trips to Comerica Park for the staff to enjoy a baseball game.

“On the way there, he would read off baseball trivia and give away little gifts,” Brosky said. “When he retired, I continued that tradition.”

Skiba said a couple of key moments from his career that helped shape his legacy were bringing Chippewa and Dakota high schools together and the creation of the ninth-grade centers.

Previously, Chippewa Valley Schools Superintendent Ron Roberts said Skiba had a passion for staff and educators and shared in the growth of the district.

“The work he has done for Chippewa Valley will be a driving force in this district for many years to come,” Roberts said.

Visitation was held July 13 and July 14 in Shelby Township, with a July 15 funeral in Sterling Heights.

Donations are welcome to the Chippewa Valley Educational Foundation.

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