Clinton Township’s annual fireworks show is July 10 on the grounds of the Civic Center. Pictured is last year’s show.

Clinton Township’s annual fireworks show is July 10 on the grounds of the Civic Center. Pictured is last year’s show.

File photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Fireworks, music, inflatables and more in Clinton Township

By: Nick Mordowanec | Fraser - Clinton Township Chronicle | Published June 28, 2019

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CLINTON TOWNSHIP — Now in its 12th year of bringing fireworks to a community of more than 100,000 residents, the Clinton Township Parks and Recreation Department continues to try and outdo itself.

This year’s fireworks presentation will take place July 10 on the grounds of the Civic Center, 40900 Romeo Plank Road. It is sponsored by First State Bank, along with York, Dolan & Tomlinson P.C., GFL, Plante Moran and the Clinton Township firefighters and police associations.

But the show itself is just a microcosm of what the department says is a real kickoff of its summer entertainment programming.

Pre-show activities start at 6 p.m. and go until 9 p.m. That includes face painting, a DJ, a mobile truck with video games, and a slew of inflatables. There will even be one inflatable setup where people can attempt to kick a field goal.

Classic food vendors will be on hand as usual, such as Big Boy, National Coney Island, Mr. Pita, Papa Romano’s and elephant ear stands. New vendors include Detroit Panzerotti Company.

Parks and Recreation Director Frank Pizzo said there will be a designated canvassing area for political initiatives. The Moravian Meeting Hall Museum and Williams Log Cabin will also be open for viewing by attendees.

The band Your Generation in Concert! will take the stage at 8:30 p.m. and play for about 90 minutes, leading to the fireworks finale around 10:05 p.m. Wolverine Fireworks Co. is in the third year of a three-year contract. Its services cost about $10,000, officials said.

Pizzo said the event has come a long way. The first fireworks event drew probably 1,000 people, he said, and now somewhere around 7,000 to 10,000 people annually take in the spectacle from the grounds, the sledding hill and even from their own backyards.

“It’s just another example of a parks and rec event where we look at every aspect of it — the safety and the fun — and we combine it with professionalism and a professional staff, good vendors and good food, good entertainment and good people. ... You get that feeling of being right there by the fireworks, but you can still see them from a distance,” Pizzo said. “Being on the grounds and seeing that grand finale, I joke and say it looks like someone threw up a Crayola box of crayons in the air.”

As to why the event traditionally occurs after Independence Day, it’s a matter of saving money coupled with kicking off the township’s summer Movies & Music in the Park series, which is every Wednesday at 6 p.m. from July 17 to Aug. 7.

The overall cost of the fireworks, inflatables, emergency services, vendors, partnerships and more costs the township about $22,000 to $25,000. However, that money is essentially recouped annualy due to the number of people who show up.

“We are happy to tell the residents (that holding the fireworks after the Fourth of July) saves us money so we can do this every year,” Pizzo said.

“I just think it’s a fun family-friendly environment and atmosphere that’s created, and that people are here just enjoying it in their backyard, in their community, with their neighbors and having all their friends come over to enjoy it with them,” said Assistant Parks and Recreation Director Brian Kay.

Parking will be available at the Civic Center, across Canal Road at St. Paul of Tarsus church, and shuttles will go back and forth from Erie Elementary, 42276 Romeo Plank Road.

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