The Farmington City Council unanimously approved a brownfield redevelopment plan for a new gas station being developed at the corner of Nine Mile and Farmington roads.

The Farmington City Council unanimously approved a brownfield redevelopment plan for a new gas station being developed at the corner of Nine Mile and Farmington roads.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Farmington City Council approves brownfield plan for new gas station

By: Jonathan Shead | Farmington Press | Published November 10, 2020

 Construction has begun at 22145 Farmington Road, the site where a new gas station will be developed by Royal Gas & Oil.

Construction has begun at 22145 Farmington Road, the site where a new gas station will be developed by Royal Gas & Oil.

Photo by Deb Jacques

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FARMINGTON — A new Amoco gas station is coming to town, and the city has approved a brownfield redevelopment plan for the project.

City Council members unanimously approved the brownfield plan Oct. 19 for the site at 22145 Farmington Road, on the corner of Nine Mile and Farmington roads. Farmington’s Brownfield Redevelopment Authority recommended the plan to council members Sept. 24.

Brownfield redevelopment plans allow the city to continue to collect tax increment financing revenue from the property’s current taxable value and allots the additional taxable revenue to be deployed as repayment to the developer for remediation of the site. During redevelopment, soil contamination was found, caused by leakage from the previous underground storage tanks left onsite.

“The whole intent there is to take a look at functionally obsolete sites or sites that have fallen into decline and help assist with their redevelopment,” Economic and Community Development Director Kevin Christiansen said.

The developer, Royal Gas and Oil, is eligible to receive up to $308,482 in reimbursable activities for a period of 30 years. Capital investment into the site is projected to cost $2 million. The development is expected to create approximately 50 construction jobs and seven permanent jobs.

Royal Gas and Oil President Jamie Robinson said the City Council’s approval of the brownfield plan will help him clean up the site and restore a current eyesore.

“Because it’s such an old gas station, and before that it was a repair facility back in the ‘30s and ‘40s, so the old hydraulic and things like that have leaked over time. It’s pretty expensive to clean that stuff up,” he said. “We’re happy to do it, because there are plenty of old stations that are contaminated that we can now revitalize, and with new technology (we can) make it where we don’t continue to do it, and help the community with something that most people don’t want to touch, and get it back up so they no longer have a vacant corner for the city to look at anymore.”

The city will continue to collect taxes on the site based on its current taxable value of $125,320, but will see an almost quadruple increase in taxes garnered from the site upon completion. The site’s taxable value is expected to jump to $450,000. Taxes for local and school millages will continue to be captured throughout the development.

Non-captured millages, such as the debt millage, the zoo millage and millages for art institutions, will see tax revenues increase by about $41,483, but only after completion of the redevelopment.

“I get really excited when these redevelopment opportunities are realized through cooperative, collaborative efforts between the city and its property owners, particularly as it relates to the redevelopment of obsolete-type sites like this gas station site has been for quite a period of time,” Christiansen said about the 0.52 acre site that has sat unoperated since 2010. “It’s very exciting to see this property being redeveloped. We are very pleased.”

Redevelopment of the site will include demolition of the current 450 square foot station building, to be replaced by a 3,800-square-foot station and convenience store. The former gas station’s existing canopy and underground storage tanks will be refurbished, and a new 4,000 gallon storage tank will be added to the property. Parking lot resurfacing, new site landscaping, new trash receptacles, and a new vapor barrier system, which will help omit any new leakage, will also be implemented at the site.

Robinson, who explained that his company has worked in southeast Michigan since its establishment in 1928 and works in oil and gas transportation with other stations in the greater Farmington area, said he saw the success those companies were having and felt erecting a station in the city himself was a good move. He was appreciative of the city’s help.

“They were fantastic to work with. They were all about different ideas, and we’ve worked with quite a few cities, and Farmington by far bent over backward to help us get this moving as quick as it has, especially in a year like we’ve been dealing with, with COVID-19,” he said. “It’s not easy getting projects up and running, and the city has been great in helping to expedite the plan.”

Construction for the site has already begun. Robinson expects to open sometime in February or March 2021.

For more information, visit farmgov.com.

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