The criminal trial for Andrew Fiacco continues inside the courtroom of 16th Circuit Court Judge Jennifer Faunce.

The criminal trial for Andrew Fiacco continues inside the courtroom of 16th Circuit Court Judge Jennifer Faunce.

Photo by Deb Jacques


Ex-girlfriend testifies in Fiacco trial

By: Alex Szwarc | Macomb Township Chronicle | Published February 4, 2019

 Fiacco stares into the camera on Jan. 29. Fiacco is represented by Kristina Joseph, sitting, and David Griem.

Fiacco stares into the camera on Jan. 29. Fiacco is represented by Kristina Joseph, sitting, and David Griem.

Photo by Deb Jacques

MOUNT CLEMENS — Eevette MacDonald took the stand on Jan. 31 in the Macomb County 16th Circuit Court courtroom of Judge Jennifer Faunce to testify against her ex-boyfriend, Andrew Fiacco, who faces charges of first-degree murder, disinterment or mutilation of a body, felony firearm, and lying to a police officer.

MacDonald, of Shelby Township, indicated to the jury that she was 17 in March 2016, when Stephen McAfee, of Macomb Township, was killed.

When she was arrested on April 27, 2017, MacDonald was interviewed by detectives for around two hours, telling them about death threats and physical threats made to her by Fiacco.

MacDonald said she was afraid of Fiacco because he had shown her a dead body.

“He told me has was a part of a Mafia group and was the technical guy, working with computers and surveillance cameras,” she said.

MacDonald also said Fiacco told her he was a hitman and killed “the bad people” for and with the Mafia.

Fiacco told her that as long as the two were together, MacDonald and her family would be protected, under a contract. If she left him, Fiacco said that she and her family would be killed.

When asked by Macomb County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney William Cataldo if Fiacco told her why he killed McAfee, MacDonald said, “Stephen had seen something he wasn’t supposed to, having to do with the Mafia, so he had to kill him.”

On the night of March 10, 2016, MacDonald was living with Fiacco at the Fiacco residence. MacDonald said she went to sleep at about 8 p.m., with Fiacco next to her. When she woke up around 3 a.m., Fiacco was gone so she went back to bed and woke up around 8 a.m., with Fiacco back in the room.

Fiacco told her he picked up McAfee and they hung out at a gas station for a few minutes, before Fiacco dropped him off and came home.

Upon learning that McAfee was missing, MacDonald said Fiacco was frustrated and angry. Fiacco asked how she would feel if McAfee was dead, to which MacDonald said she would feel sorry and sad.

Around April 2016, Fiacco allegedly told MacDonald he killed McAfee, saying that McAfee had seen something on his phone related to the Mafia.

At the end of April 2016, Fiacco, armed with a gun, took MacDonald to the scene of the alleged murder, in the area of 34 Mile Road and Van Dyke Avenue.

“I was terrified. I didn’t know what was going to happen,” MacDonald said. “I was told to get out and walk in front, to not look back. “

After walking 10 to 15 minutes, MacDonald saw the body, with Fiacco still carrying a gun.

“I thought he was going to shoot me,” she told the jury. “I was terrified and scared, I didn’t think he was capable of doing something like that.”

The two went back to the body, a month later. She said it was not a voluntary effort on her part. This time, she said, Fiacco brought a duffle bag, an ax and the same gun, telling her the whole body wouldn’t fit in the bag, so it would have to be taken in half.

“I was told I still have to help because of the Mafia,” she said.

MacDonald said the two went out to the site a third time, again with Fiacco carrying a gun. This time, MacDonald didn’t exit the vehicle.

In December, MacDonald pleaded guilty to one count of accessory after the fact to a felony and one count of disinterment and mutilation of dead bodies. The third count of lying to a police officer in a violent crime investigation will be dismissed at her sentencing on March 7.

Accessory after the fact is punishable by up to to five years in prison, and disinterment and mutilation of dead bodies is punishable by up 10 years in prison.

First-degree murder carries an automatic penalty of life in prison without parole.