Mercantile Fairs will be hosting the first Foodie Fair in Shed Five of Detroit’s Eastern Market on Sunday, Sept. 22. The group produces several events in the city, including the flea market also held in Shed Five, pictured.

Mercantile Fairs will be hosting the first Foodie Fair in Shed Five of Detroit’s Eastern Market on Sunday, Sept. 22. The group produces several events in the city, including the flea market also held in Shed Five, pictured.

Photo provided by Danielle Golinski


Eastern Market to host first Foodie Fair

By: Brendan Losinski | Advertiser Times | Published September 13, 2019

 The Foodie Fair at Eastern Market Sept. 22 will feature a variety of local and artisanal food products, such as Bea’s Squeeze lemonade.

The Foodie Fair at Eastern Market Sept. 22 will feature a variety of local and artisanal food products, such as Bea’s Squeeze lemonade.

Photo provided by Danielle Golinski

 Country Home Creations will be among the local vendors selling their products.

Country Home Creations will be among the local vendors selling their products.

Photo provided by Danielle Golinski

DETROIT — Everyone from cuisine aficionados to people looking for quality snacks is invited to attend the first Foodie Fair at Detroit’s Eastern Market.

The event, intended to become an annual occurrence, will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22, in Shed Five of Eastern Market, 2934 Russell St. It will be a celebration of Detroit’s cooking and food culture and will offer attendees a variety of treats and attractions.

“It is showcasing local food-related items of the Detroit area community,” explained Danielle Golinski, the marketing manager for the Foodie Fair. “This is anything from food trucks to small-batch makers. Taste the Local Difference will be there to show what they have to offer. We also have people selling handmade cooking implements and jewelry made out of food tins and silverware and such.”

Stephanie Jones is the founder and president of Mercantile Fairs, the Foodie Fair’s parent company, which has hosted several events around Detroit in recent years. She said such an event seemed like a natural fit for the Detroit area.

“Detroit Foodie Fair came to be because, while the food culture in Detroit is very robust, I could see that the spotlight was mainly reserved for restaurants and chefs,” she said in an email. “I wanted to create an event that would give small-batch makers, food trucks and artisans with handcrafted wares an opportunity to shine. That mixed with the fact that people love a great food event. (With) our partnership with Eastern Market, it seemed like a win-win situation and everything fell into place.”

The organizers believe this will be the first of many Foodie Fairs, and they hope it will become a Detroit tradition.

“This is the first year this event will be put on,” said Golinski. “Mercantile Fairs is the parent company and has been in business for 12 years, and they promote a lot of other shows. We have a long relationship with the Eastern Market, and we’re partnering with (local food and farm resource) Taste the Local Difference. The goal is to provide a wide variety of offerings for people to check out.”

It has been certified as a local food event by Taste the Local Difference, which means that it will have at least 20% of its food from local sources, and steps will be taken at the fair to reduce waste.

Attendees can pick their favorite attraction or booth and vote for it as part of a competition going on throughout the day.

“We’re also holding voting this year so attendees will be able to vote for their favorite ‘foodie find’ and the winners get a little trophy and are named the best foodie find,” Golinski said. “We want people to play an active role in the Foodie Fair.”

For those who regularly attend Eastern Market on Sundays, the rest of the Sunday market will still be going on while the Foodie Fair is happening in Shed Five. Golinski said the event looks as though it will be popular.

“We have 14,000 interested attendees on Facebook (as of Sept. 6), so we’re expecting a big crowd,” she said. “People can expect a sampling of southeast Michigan’s finest food offerings. It’s a celebration of Michigan’s food businesses. … It should be a fun and tasty day.”