Pictured is Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital staff physician Jasper Yung. As a member of the Detroit Medical Orchestra, Yung had the opportunity to be part of a project involving violinist Joshua Bell.

Pictured is Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital staff physician Jasper Yung. As a member of the Detroit Medical Orchestra, Yung had the opportunity to be part of a project involving violinist Joshua Bell.

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes


Detroit Medical Orchestra members take part in project involving famous violinist Joshua Bell

By: Mark Vest | West Bloomfield Beacon | Published August 20, 2020

 Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital staff physician Jasper Yung was recently part of a YouTube video titled “Bach Double Violin Concerto – a tribute to healthcare workers with Joshua Bell.”

Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital staff physician Jasper Yung was recently part of a YouTube video titled “Bach Double Violin Concerto – a tribute to healthcare workers with Joshua Bell.”

Photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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WEST BLOOMFIELD — Members of the Detroit Medical Orchestra recently had the opportunity to be part of a musical collaboration with violinist Joshua Bell.

The DMO is a group of musicians who work in the medical field.

Evan Liang is a medical resident at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

“The PR team for Josh Bell, they had reached out to our orchestra,” Liang said. “They had looked into getting a number of medical professionals to play a kind of duet of sorts with Josh Bell. I felt like (it) was a good opportunity, and I was just one of the violinists who had participated in this collaboration.”

The piece was posted on YouTube and features medical workers/violinists from different parts of the country.

After Bell recorded his part, Liang said, “We all then used his recording as a standard to record with. Everyone’s attempting to sync up their video with his original.”

The piece performed was Bach’s Double Violin Concerto.

Members of the orchestra played their parts individually and then submitted their contributions.

Liang practiced approximately a week prior to having his part recorded.

He submitted his part, which was recorded in a conference room at Henry Ford Hospital, to someone from Bell’s team around Memorial Day, with the video coming out in late July.

“It takes a lot of effort on their part to edit it and put it all together,” Liang said. “Our part in it was just to contribute our instrumental voices, so to speak.”

West Bloomfield resident Jasper Yung is a staff physician at Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital and part of the DMO.

His part was recorded at home.

“We were very fortunate to be part of this,” Yung said.

“This collaboration was kind of a music montage that he (Bell) wanted to put together to showcase different musicians that are medical professionals,” Yung said. “He reached out because of this whole pandemic.”

Despite not recording simultaneously with other musicians, the project means more to Yung than just his part in it.

“It feels very satisfying to know that I’m part of something much larger than just myself,” he said. “Being part of an orchestra, individually, we provide our part, our music, but we actually add to a collective whole.”

Georgiana Marusca is a resident in internal medicine at the Detroit Medical Center.

She also had her part recorded at home and referred to being part of Bell’s project as a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”

“It was very exciting because I’ve been playing since first grade and I’ve been familiar with the name Joshua Bell for a number of years,” Marusca said. “I did not hesitate for one second to agree to this project.”

His role as a medical professional has given Yung an up-close view of the pain and sorrow that has come as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The collaboration can help serve as a balm for what he has experienced.

“In the beginning, it was very stressful, very difficult to see just how overwhelmed our whole health care infrastructure became,” Yung said. “It was pretty bad, what it did to the patients. We had a lot of them being placed on life support almost daily, several daily, in the beginning. Now it’s improved, much improved since it began. First couple months were very difficult.”

With the collaborative piece now available to the public at large, more people can take comfort in the music.

“I like that it helps people to see that, through all the difficult times and everything this pandemic has put people through, that music is still there,” Yung said.

Hearing and seeing the finished product may have been Yung’s favorite part of the entire process.

“To see the final product, how it all came together, it was very rewarding and very surprising to see that it actually came to fruition,” he said.

The YouTube video is titled “Bach Double Violin Concerto – a tribute to healthcare workers with Joshua Bell.”

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