County board chair to not seek re-election

By: Thomas Franz | C&G Newspapers | Published April 14, 2016

 Flynn, D-Sterling Heights, is serving his fifth term after becoming the youngest commissioner ever elected to the board at age 20, and he became the youngest commissioner at age 26.

Flynn, D-Sterling Heights, is serving his fifth term after becoming the youngest commissioner ever elected to the board at age 20, and he became the youngest commissioner at age 26.

File photo by Erin Sanchez

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MOUNT CLEMENS — The chairman of the Macomb County Board of Commissioners announced April 13 that he will not seek re-election this fall.

Dave Flynn, D-Sterling Heights, is serving his fifth term after becoming the youngest commissioner ever elected to the board at age 20 and becoming the youngest board chair at age 26.

“I am truly privileged to have had the responsibility to hold the positions entrusted to me by my constituents and colleagues,” Flynn said in a press release.

Flynn said that he is unsure of his future at the moment, but intends to keep business as usual through the end of his time as board chair.

“While everyone is out campaigning, and the 2016 presidential race heats up, I plan to do exactly as I’ve done since 2006; that is to show up to work, do my best to deliver on issues that are important to residents and to leave the county a little bit better than when I arrived,” Flynn said.

Flynn pointed to the public policy part of his position as board chair as the aspect that he enjoyed most.

“Knowing that good public policies have improved the lives of people in our community has personally sustained me through the rough-and-tumble landscape of political life,” Flynn said.

Flynn also listed several projects that resulted from collaboration between county officials, business leaders and community leaders.

Those projects he mentioned included the establishment of satellite campuses for Wayne State University and Oakland University, creating a sustainable funding model for the Detroit Institute of Arts and the Detroit Zoo, the formation of a regional transit authority, and instituting the county’s largest capital investment and revitalization project in county history.

“The past ten years have been a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to serve my city, county, and state,” Flynn said. “During the past decade, I experienced challenges that inherently come with elected office. Despite those ups and downs, I still consider myself a lucky guy. For a short time, I had an important job during a critical juncture in Macomb County’s history.”

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