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 Young trees, planted through the city’s tree-planting program, grow at Grant Park in Clawson. On June 16, the Clawson City Council approved the lowest-priced, qualified bid for this year’s program.

Young trees, planted through the city’s tree-planting program, grow at Grant Park in Clawson. On June 16, the Clawson City Council approved the lowest-priced, qualified bid for this year’s program.

Photo by Sarah Wojcik


Clawson approves tree-planting program

By: Sarah Wojcik | Royal Oak Review | Published June 23, 2020

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CLAWSON — On June 16, the Clawson City Council unanimously approved a tree-planting bid with the lowest qualified bidder, China Township-based Marine City Nursery.

Clawson Department of Public Works Director Matthew Hodges said the city tries to make the tree-planting program an annual one, depending on funding, and the budget for this year is approximately $31,000.

He recently applied for a DTE Energy Foundation Tree Planting Grant for $4,000, with the city providing matching funds of $4,000, for a total budget of $35,000. He said the city would receive word if it had acquired the grant in August, and he anticipated planting 100-120 trees mostly in public rights of way in front of residential homes.

Some of the trees to be planted include various species of maples, lindens, autumn gold, ivory silk and elm.

“They’re all field grown, not container grown,” Hodges said. “We notify residents about two weeks prior to them coming out and planting them to say they are getting a tree, and if they don’t want it, we try to find another resident that does. If we run out of places in the public right of way, we’ll plant any extra trees in a park.”

He said the DPW does its best to place trees on residential rights of way where the homeowner desires the tree, as those trees’ survival rates seem to be much higher.

The DPW is also in charge of maintaining, trimming and taking down trees throughout the city.

“We like trying to replant them from where we removed them in the past,” Hodges said.

He added that Clawson has been named a Tree City USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation for the past 30 years.

Clawson Mayor Reese Scripture said the city plans to revamp its ordinance in the future in relation to the tree-planting program.

“One of the things is our ordinance lists what kind of trees you can have in the right of way, and I believe the ordinance is pretty old. Some are not the best recommendations anymore for things like diversity,” Scripture said. “It has been a conversation in the background as far as one of the things we need to update.

She added that the topic comes up in the Planning Commission sometimes, as far as a need to update the ordinance for more modern and sustainable options.

For more information, call Clawson City Hall at (248) 435-4500 or visit cityofclawson.org.

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